Jon Denning

Jon Denning is PowerScore's Vice President and oversees product creation and instructor training for all of the exam services PowerScore offers. He is also a Senior Instructor with 99th percentile scores on the LSAT, GMAT, GRE, SAT, and ACT. Jon is widely regarded as one of the nation's foremost authorities on LSAT preparation, and for the past decade has assisted thousands of students in the law school admissions process. He has also created/co-created a number of PowerScore’s LSAT courses and publications, including the Full-length, Live Online, and Accelerated LSAT Courses, the Advanced Logic Games Course, the Advanced Logical Reasoning Course, and a number of books in PowerScore’s popular LSAT Deconstructed Series.

Recent Posts

One Month Until the LSAT: Everything You Need to Know

Posted by Jon Denning on

You're less than four weeks from the next official LSAT administration.

That's right, you're into your final month! 

Don't panic! I'm not here to freak you out. On the contrary, I'm here to help.

The next month is all about improving your LSAT score, bolstering your confidence, and instilling a positive mentality. If you are a student currently enrolled in a PowerScore course, congratulations: the course itself (and your instructor(s), of course) will give you all of the structure and guidance you need to make the most of your time! For non-students, however, the path may be a little less clear, and you are my intended audience for this post. 

Below you'll find a list of resources, links, and general suggestions, all designed to help you make the most of these last few weeks and finish--or, dare I say it, even start--strong! 

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Topics: LSAT Prep

What Does it Mean to "Go Grey" on LSAT Score Release Day?

Posted by Jon Denning on

One of the most common talking points you'll hear leading up to an LSAT score releaseand incessantly on the day scores become availableis the notion of "going grey." In fact a hysterical flurry of "I'M  GREY!!" announcements on twitter and elsewhere is one of the most reliable predictors that scores are imminent.

So what's all this grey business about, and how can you determine your own color status?

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Topics: LSAT Prep

When Will December 2017 LSAT Scores Be Released? Our Prediction!

Posted by Jon Denning on

December 2017 LSAT takers have one burning question in mind: When exactly will my score be released?

Per LSAC, December 2017 LSAT scores are slated to be released on Wednesday, January 3rd, 2018. However, past LSAC score-release trends indicate that scores are almost always released earlier than the official date (except when weather conditions have interfered with the original test dates, as was the case with the February 2013 LSAT). So, even though you still have to wait to get your score, you probably won't have to wait until the score-release date designated by the test makers. 

So when will you have it?

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Topics: lsat

The Ultimate Guide to the LSAT Writing Sample

Posted by Jon Denning on

Your LSAT score is the result of your performance on a predetermined collection of multiple-choice tasks: two scored sections of Logical Reasoning, one scored section of Reading Comprehension, and one scored section of Analytical Reasoning (better known as Logic Games). In addition to those four, there will also be a fifth, unscored multiple-choice section known as the Experimental, which will present another of the three types—either a third LR, second RC, or second LG. These five sections can appear in any order, and are largely unpredictable as you work your way through the exam.

But that's not the entirety of your test day.

What many fail to realize, or at the very least fail to fully understand, is that official LSATs also contain a sixth section, given in a separate test booklet and administered after the completion of the five sections described above: the Writing Sample. And it's this final section that I want to talk about today.

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Topics: LSAT Prep

LSAT Anxiety and the Power of Positive Thinking

Posted by Jon Denning on

With the LSAT fast approaching, I want to briefly step away from talk of test concepts, and remind everyone of one of the most important, and (sadly) most-overlooked, components of test success: a positive mental outlook. That is, at some point in the next 10 days or so you should feel as though your conceptual preparation is complete, and your focus should begin to shift instead towards preparing yourself mentally for an amazing test day experience. Here are a few keys tips that will help get you mentally ready in the days ahead.

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Topics: LSAT Test Mentality, LSAT Prep

Mind the Clock! The Importance of Preparing for the LSAT with a Timer

Posted by Jon Denning on

The LSAT is a remarkably challenging test, in large part because it measures both intricate conceptual understanding, as well as application of that understanding under rigorous time pressure. Put another way: The LSAT is an exam which tests a particular skill set, but it is also a test of efficiency. 

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Topics: LSAT Prep

Is It Too Late to Start Studying for the December LSAT? No!

Posted by Jon Denning on

With the final December 2017 LSAT registration set for next Wednesday (10/25), I've been getting a single question over and over from anxious students: "Am I too late to do well on the December LSAT if I haven't started studying?"

The short answer is, "No!"

The longer answer however is a bit more nuanced, and I want to share it with you below (taken verbatim from an actual reply I provided to a student this week):

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Topics: LSAT Prep

The September 2017 LSAT Scoring Scale Analyzed

Posted by Jon Denning on

The scores from the September 2017 LSAT have just been released, and the scoring scale is hot off the presses. We’ve already done a breakdown of the Logical Reasoning sections from this test , and will have more section-specific discussions in the days ahead, but in the meantime I wanted to take a moment to analyze the scoring scale and what it tells us about the logical difficulty of this exam. As my colleague Dave Killoran has written elsewhere, each LSAT scoring scale is adjusted to fit the difficulty of that particular test:

"Although the number of questions per test has remained relatively constant over the years, the logical difficulty of each test has varied. This is not surprising since the test is made by humans, and there is no precise way to completely predetermine logical difficulty. To account for these variances in test "toughness," the test makers adjust the Scoring Conversion Chart for each LSAT in order to make similar LSAT scores from different tests mean the same thing."

So, the looseness or tightness of the scale will reflect the logical difficulty of the exam (looser scale with a harder exam, tighter scale with an easier exam), and can have a significant impact on final scores. With that in mind, how did this one turn out?

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Topics: LSAT Prep

October 14th LSAT News: Digital Pilot Test 2.0 and Another September Make-Up

Posted by Jon Denning on

Tomorrow, 10/14, represents an unusual day in LSAT land, with the second iteration of LSAC's Digital LSAT Pilot Test program, as well as the second make-up date for September 16th enrollees, both being held in select locations.

Since I know people will want to discuss these tests—I've already been getting questions from both groups—I figured I'd get the party started and provide a few thoughts.

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Topics: LSAT Prep