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SAT Word of the Day - Anthropocentrism

Posted by PowerScore Test Preparation on Jul 25, 2014 8:00:00 AM


Anthropocentrism

(n.) theory that regards humans as the central element of the universe

(pronounced "an-thruh-poh-SEN-triz-uhm")

  

alien

Example Sentence:

  • People who support the theory of anthropocentrism have a difficult time believing in the existence of intelligent life on other planets.

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SAT Word of the Day - Analgesic

Posted by PowerScore Test Preparation on Jul 24, 2014 8:00:00 AM


Analgesic

(adj.) capable of relieving pain

(pronounced "an-l-JEE-zik")

  

principal

Example Sentence:

  • Although Andy was in the most painful stages of the disease, his daughter’s visit was analgesic; he was so happy to see her that his pain was significantly reduced.

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* We will choose a new winner each month. Good luck!

 


 

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SAT Word of the Day - Amalgamation

Posted by PowerScore Test Preparation on Jul 23, 2014 8:00:00 AM


Amalgamation

(n.) a combination

(pronounced "uh-mal-guh-MEY-shuhn")

  

ballet

Example Sentence:

  • Amy’s new dance routine is an amalgamation of styles, including ballet and jazz.

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How to Prepare for the PSAT

Posted by Vicki Wood on Jul 23, 2014 7:00:00 AM

Motivated sophomores and Books2juniors who are looking to prepare for the PSAT are often surprised by what they find—or don’t find—on the shelves at the local bookstore and in the course catalogs of test prep companies. While the market seems flooded with SAT prep material, PSAT offerings—especially prep courses—are limited. Even the College Board, the maker of the two tests, offers SAT books, SAT online courses, and an entire web page dedicated to free SAT test prep, but their PSAT contributions are limited to a handful of sample questions. So how do students prepare for the test that holds the key to several major scholarships? 

The answer is simple: use SAT prep material and take SAT courses.

The tests are not just similar in name alone. The Preliminary SAT (PSAT) is basically a mini version of the SAT—its little brother, so to speak—where the overwhelming majority of questions can be interchanged between the two tests.  The only differences? The PSAT has half as many sections (and is thus only half as long), it lacks an Essay, and it does not test the most difficult function questions included on the SAT. It makes sense, then, for students to study from material that is designed for SAT prep, provided they skip the sections on the Essay. This way, students get the best prep material for the PSAT, and it’s useful again in the following year or two when the they are ready to tackle the SAT.

While some independent learners do well studying on their own, most students find they do best in a typical academic setting and as a result enroll in a course. Because the PSAT does not carry the same weight as the SAT, many of our clients choose a weekend SAT course to prepare for the PSAT.  So what can the PSAT student learn in as single weekend SAT class? Our expert instructors will guide you through the content of the tests and expose how the College Board assesses that content. For example, they will reintroduce you to a right circular cylinder and share the formula for finding the volume of that cylinder. Then, once you are comfortable with the content, they will reveal the two types of questions involving cylinders on the PSAT and SAT: those that require you to use the volume formula and those that require you to find a hidden triangle in the cylinder. Our weekend course covers all of the math included on the PSAT.

The Reading sections of the PSAT and SAT are identical, so the SAT course is ideal for preparing for Reading on the PSAT. We will lead you through Sentence Completion and Passage-Based Reading questions while providing you with a list of the most commonly occurring vocabulary words. These words occur on both the PSAT and the SAT, so students can continue to study it beyond the PSAT.

The multiple-choice Writing sections on the PSAT and SAT are identical 35-question sections, so the grammatical content in our Weekend SAT Course refers to both tests. Instructors will pinpoint the most common errors on the test, from Subject Verb Agreement issues to Misplaced Modifiers. Learning to spot certain error indicators can increase your speed and raise your score significantly. The Essay is the last concept addressed in the course; while the PSAT does not have an Essay, PSAT students are urged to participate in this portion of the course anyway, since they will be composing an Essay in the future for the SAT.

So if you are searching for PSAT prep material, don’t panic when the bookshelves and course catalogs seem deficient. The abundance of SAT offerings are the best options for both your PSAT and SAT prep, provided you choose material or courses produced by companies with a reputation for the highest score increases.

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Topics: PSAT Prep

SAT Word of the Day - Abstemious

Posted by PowerScore Test Preparation on Jul 22, 2014 8:00:00 AM


Abstemious

(adj.) sparing in consumption, especially of food and drink

(pronounced "ab-STEE-mee-uhs") 

  

principal

Example Sentence:

  • Abby’s emaciated figure was the result of her abstemious lifestyle; she never ate breakfast or lunch, and rarely ate dinner.

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SAT Word of the Day - Conventional

Posted by PowerScore Test Preparation on Jul 21, 2014 8:00:00 AM


Conventional

(adj.) following accepted customs and behaviors

(pronounced "kuhn-VEN-shuh-nl")

  

wedding

Example Sentence:

  • Consuelo favored conventional wedding vows, while Callie wanted to break tradition and write her own.

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SAT Word of the Day - Assume

Posted by PowerScore Test Preparation on Jul 18, 2014 8:00:00 AM


Assume

(v.) to accept as true without proof

(pronounced "uh-SOOM")

  

play

Example Sentence:

  • Everyone was amazed that Robert would try out for the lead in the school play; they had assumed that because he was a quiet boy, that he was also shy.

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SAT Word of the Day - Adversary

Posted by PowerScore Test Preparation on Jul 17, 2014 8:00:00 AM


Adversary

(n.) an opponent or enemy

(pronounced "AD-ver-ser-ee")

  

mean

Example Sentence:

  • The character's adversary plotted to embarrass her during the homecoming dance.

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SAT Word of the Day - Inhibit

Posted by PowerScore Test Preparation on Jul 16, 2014 8:00:00 AM


Inhibit

(v.) to reduce, restrain, hinder, arrest, or check

(pronounced "in-HIB-it")

  

Inhibit

Example Sentence:

  • After drinking three beers at the party, Dave's ability to drive safely was inhibited.

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SAT Tips and Tricks: "True to You" Reading Answers

Posted by Vicki Wood on Jul 16, 2014 7:00:00 AM

There are certain facts that everyone just knowsHibernate: the earth orbits the sun. Yellow and blue make green. Martin Luther King Jr. had a dream. An adjective modifies a noun or pronoun. Bees make honey.

Unfortunately, what you know has no place on the SAT Critical Reading section. The Passage-Based Reading questions assess how well you read a passage, not what you know about the topic in the passage. One of the biggest mistakes a student can make is to bring his or her experience and expectations into the SAT. Your opinions and prior knowledge are not relevant on the reading portion of the test, and you should be careful not to let them influence your understanding of a text.

"True to You" answers are wrong answer choices designed to take advantage of your assumptions and previous experience with a topic. Consider a simplified passage and sample question:

In late summer, black bears begin gorging on carbohydrate-rich foods in order to put on significant weight and body fat. They can gain as much as 30 pounds in a single week! Once fall arrives, the bear prepares its den, lining it wiht leaves and other plants to form a nest.

1. According to the passage, black bears seek "carbohydrate-rich foods" (line 1) primarily because they

(A) are preparing to hibernate
(B) need to considerably increase their body mass

Unless you skipped kindergarten and most of elementary school, it’s likely that you know bears hibernate. Answer choice (A) is depending on this knowledge to seduce you into selecting it as the right answer choice. But you would be wrong.

The passage never mentions hibernation. The reason it provides for the black bears gorging on carbs is to put on significant weight and body fat. The correct answer is (B). But many, many test takers would choose (A) because they applied their prior knowledge to the passage and failed to read the remaining answer choice.

If the author does not state or imply an idea, it simply is not true in the context of the passage. Read each answer choice carefully to determine whether the information contained within is presented in the passage or is playing on your prior knowledge.

Did you find this helpful? If so, check out the other types of answer traps in a free chapter from our SAT Reading Bible!

 

Photo: Does a bear shoot in the woods?, courtesy of Theresa Thompson

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Topics: SAT Reading

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