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SAT Word of the Day- Arid

Posted by PowerScore Test Preparation on Aug 29, 2014 11:00:00 AM


Arid 

(adj.) dry; lacking rainfall


(pronounced “AR-id”)
 
No Rain

Example Sentence:

My grandmother claims that Arizona’s arid climate helps her arthritis, while Alabama’s humidity makes her hands swell.

Create your own sentence and post it below!

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How to Tell If You Are Ready to Take the SAT

Posted by Vicki Wood on Aug 28, 2014 2:40:22 PM

You’ve answered the SAT Question Preparedof the Day every day for four months. You’ve bought the SAT prep books and worked through all of the questions in The Official SAT Study Guide. You’ve even signed up for the October SAT.

But how do you know if you’re really ready to take the test?

PRACTICE TESTS

The SAT is a standardized test, so your score on one official version should be very similar to your score on another. The best way to determine if you are ready for an official administration is to compute your scores on a timed practice test. Do these scores meet your goals? Are they similar to or higher than the scores required by your prospective colleges? If so, you are ready for the real SAT. Most students can expect their official scores to be slightly lower than their practice scores, given the pressure and unfamiliar testing conditions that exist with the real deal. But the difference is not usually large enough to warrant much concern.

If you scores are not in your target range, you likely need more study. The official SAT is no time for a practice test! Too many students take the test “just to see how I do,” and these scores are stuck with them forever. Most schools request that all scores be sent with the application, so even though the College Board offers Score Choice, you may not have a chance to use it. Only take a real SAT when you feel you are completely prepared. A practice test should be taken at home on the kitchen table or in a proctored SAT class, not at an official test administration!

If you’ve taken all of the practice tests in the Official SAT Study Guide, you can find three free ones online:

OFFICIAL SAT PRACTICE TEST 2013-14
Scoring Instructions

OFFICIAL SAT PRACTICE TEST 2012-13

Scoring Instructions

OFFICIAL SAT PRACTICE TEST 2007-08

CONFIDENCE

Before taking the SAT, assess your confidence level. How do you feel about your preparation? Are you terrified or simply anxious? A student who is well-prepared may have butterflies, but they feel like they are ready to tackle the test. They are confident that they know what the test entails and what kinds of questions they will be asked, because they have studied and learned the secrets of the SAT.

To increase your confidence, you must familiarize yourself with the test, but the best way to study is different for each student. Some self-directed learners do well just using The Official SAT Study Guide and taking practice tests on their own. Others need an additional, more detailed book that breaks down the test patterns for them which helps them as they work through the practice tests in the blue book. Still others need a more structured environment in a classroom, where test experts guide them through the patterns and the tests in the blue book. Only you can determine which method is best for you.

So if your practice test scores are in or near your target range, and if you feel confident in your knowledge of the test, hesitate no more. It’s time to take the SAT.

 

Photo: "Be Prepared," courtesty of Calsidyrose

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SAT Word of the Day- Cerebral

Posted by PowerScore Test Preparation on Aug 28, 2014 11:00:00 AM


Cerebral 

(adj.) involving intelligence rather than emotions or instinct

(pronounced “suh-REE-bruhl”)

accountant

Example Sentence:

Although Sarah was so angry that she wanted to quit the club, she decided to take a cerebral approach and weigh the costs before making a decision.

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SAT Word of the Day- Archaic

Posted by PowerScore Test Preparation on Aug 27, 2014 4:00:00 PM


Archaic 

(adj.) so extremely old as seeming to belong to an earlier period

(pronounced “ahr-KAY-ik”)
 
No Rain

Example Sentence:

The college cannot have sorority or fraternity houses because of an archaic town law that does not allow unmarried people to live together.

Click the "Read More" or "Leave A Comment" link to leave a sentence of your own!

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SAT Word of the Day- Fallacy

Posted by PowerScore Test Preparation on Aug 26, 2014 11:00:00 AM


Fallacy

(n.) a deceptive, misleading, or false notion or belief

(pronounced "FAHL-uh-see")  

  

sample2

Example Sentences:

  • Mythbusters is a popular television show that delights in debunking popular urban fallacies.
  • Rick was completely unable to lie to his parents; they were always able to see through his intricate fallacies.

Create your own sentence and post it below. 


 

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SAT Word of the Day- Abate

Posted by PowerScore Test Preparation on Aug 25, 2014 11:00:00 AM


Abate

(v.) to reduce or diminish

(pronounced "uh-BAIT")

  

reduce

Example Sentences:

  • I took some aspirin, hoping it would abate my headache.
  • The earplugs only slightly abated the roaring sound of the airplane propellers.

Create your own sentence and post it below. 


 

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SAT Word of the Day- Imperceptible

Posted by PowerScore Test Preparation on Aug 22, 2014 11:00:00 AM


Imperceptible
(adj.) very slight, gradual, or subtle


(pronounced “im-per-SEP-tuh-buhl”)
 

  

Monopoly money

Example Sentence:

The differences between the real money and the counterfeit money are imperceptible, so it was no surprise that the cashier did not notice the fake bill.

Click the "Read More" or "Leave A Comment" link to leave a sentence of your own!

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SAT Word of the Day-Paradox

Posted by PowerScore Test Preparation on Aug 21, 2014 11:00:00 AM


Paradox

(n.) a statement that contradicts itself but nevertheless may still be true

(pronounced “PAR-uh-doks”)
 

  

lies

Example Sentence:

Parker said, “I always lie,” but this is a paradox; if the statement is true, then he must be lying.

Leave a sentence of your own in the comments!

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How Correlating Conjunctions Correlate to Your SAT Score

Posted by Vicki Wood on Aug 20, 2014 2:30:20 PM

Some SAT questions may test your knowledge of correlating conjunctions, which are pairs of coordinating conjunctions:

either..or          neither..nor         both..and        not only..but also       
not..but            whether..or            as..as

The College Board seems to think they can trip you up by using a correlating conjunction without its proper partner. The first four listed above—either..or, neither..nor, both..and, and not only..but also—cause the most problems on the SAT.

Notre_Dame-1

Correlating Conjunctions 1 resized 600                           

As you can see, not only is partnered with and also. The correct correlation is not only..but also:

      The flying buttresses on Notre Dame de Paris not only serve to add embellishment to the cathedral, which many argue is the most beautiful in France, but also to support and protect the structure.      [Correct]

There are no exceptions to this rule. If you see not only in a sentence on the SAT, but also must appear elsewhere in the sentence. The error is in choice (C).

There are several popular mis-pairings to watch for on the SAT. The College Board most often uses the following incorrect pairs:

      INCORRECT ALARM BELLS

      either X and Y     

      neither X or Y    

      both X plus Y       

      both X as well as Y      

      not only X also Y      

      not only X and also Y      

      not only X but Y     

Note that the words either and neither can be used as pronouns, adjectives, and adverbs, but when they are used as conjunctions, they must be placed with their proper correlating partner. Let’s examine a question that tests one of these words as a conjunction:

Correlating Conjunctions 2

 

   Baseball-2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Neither should never be with or. To correct the baseball sentence, use neither with nor:

Neither Pete Rose, the leader in hits in major league baseball, nor Shoeless Joe Jackson, the only rookie to hit over .400, has been admitted to the Hall of Fame. [Correct]

The error is contained in choice (A).

Can you guess the most common wrong answer in this question? Most students incorrectly choose (D) as the error. But because Joe Jackson is singular and the closest noun to the verb, the verb has been admitted must be singular. To review this rule, check Chapter 5 of The PowerScore SAT Reading Bible.

The following questions from The Official SAT Study Guide illustrate errors with correlating conjunctions:

Page 409, #18

Page 471, #15

Page 533, #17

Page 601, #14

Page 721, #28

 

Photos: "Flying Buttresses, Notre Dame," courtesy of Peter Rivera, and "Shoeless Joe Jackson - Chicago White Sox," courtesy of John Seb Barber

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Topics: SAT Tip of the Week

SAT Word of the Day- Stymie

Posted by PowerScore Test Preparation on Aug 19, 2014 2:30:00 PM

Stymie

(v.) to stump or hinder

(pronounced “STAHY-mee”)
 

  

prison escape

Example Sentence:

The warden was stymied by how the prisoners had escaped; their cell doors were still locked, and there were no obvious holes in the walls of the cell.

Leave a sentence of your own in the comments!

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