Posted by on 2/10/2016

When you're applying to grad school, one school just isn't enough. Somewhere between five and ten is a more sensible number to apply to. It's also a more difficult number to keep track of. Grad school applications tend to have several parts, and different grad schools can have different requirements.  But there's an easy way to stay on top of it all.

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Topics: Grad School Admissions

Posted by on 2/3/2016

If you're reading this, then you're thinking about taking the GRE without studying. In fact, you're thinking twice about it—as you should be. Going in 'cold' could make you less likely to earn your best score and thus more likely to limit the schools that will accept you—or else more likely to study (finally), retake the exam, and raise your score before applying (deadlines permitting). Still tempted to skip the prep and just take the test? Keep reading.

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Topics: GRE prep

Posted by on 1/27/2016

Triangles dominate GRE geometry. Make sure you learn the area formula for a triangle (½ base × height) plus facts like "the sum of a triangle's interior angles is 180°." But you probably already know about that stuff. Here are some GRE triangle facts you may not know about.

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Topics: GRE prep, Quantitative

Posted by on 1/20/2016

Argument passages in GRE Reading Comp vary in complexity. If you're asked to weaken or strengthen an argument, then the passage probably contains just one conclusion. But if you're asked to identify the roles that parts of the passage play in an argument, then the text may include a main conclusion and an intermediate conclusion. See whether you can spot the conclusion(s) in this passage.

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Topics: Verbal, GRE prep, Reading Comprehension

Posted by on 1/13/2016

GRE Reading Comp questions that make you think critically are rarely easy. In fact, some will be very hard. But others will be medium difficulty, like this week's "weaken the argument" question.

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Topics: Verbal, GRE prep, Reading Comprehension

Posted by on 1/6/2016

When it comes to quadratics in GRE algebra, you might think the only equation you should memorize is, well, the quadratic equation: ax2 + bx + c = 0. But an expression like ax2 + bx + c can take many forms, and some come up more often than others on the exam. Call the more common ones classic GRE quadratic forms.

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Topics: GRE prep, Quantitative

Posted by on 12/30/2015

GRE algebra can get weird sometimes. Strange markings like    or    will appear in equations that otherwise use ordinary operators like  +  and  . Unusual symbols in GRE Quant are the hallmark of symbolic functions—pairings of inputs and outputs that, as it turns out, are connected by some pretty standard math.

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Topics: GRE prep, Quantitative

Posted by on 12/16/2015

GRE Reading Comp passages usually try to persuade you of something. An argument is given, and your job is to analyze it. Some of the hardest Verbal questions require you to identify information that would strengthen an argument. For practice, try this Reading Comp question that likely just 2 in 10 test takers would get right.

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Topics: Verbal, GRE prep

Posted by on 12/9/2015

GRE data analysis includes some tough Quant topics. One is standard deviation, a measure of how far the values in a data set tend to fall from the set's mean. This statistic can be confusing and tedious to calculate. Luckily, you probably won't need to calculate it when it comes up on the exam. Try this hard standard deviation question to see what I mean.

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Topics: GRE prep, Quantitative

Posted by on 12/2/2015

GRE geometry can sometimes seem like a formula fest. Formulas matter, for sure, but simply memorizing them isn't enough. You also need to know how to use them  efficiently. For practice, try this Quantitative Comparison question that requires you to apply the volume formula for a cylinder.

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Topics: GRE prep, Quantitative