February 2008-2016 LSAT Details

Posted by Jon Denning on

Of the various LSAT administrations offered each year, the most mysterious and often confounding for attendees has traditionally been February. The reason for this is that the February exam is nondisclosed: LSAC only releases your final score and its percentile, so you won't receive a copy of the test itself, the scoring scale, or your answer sheet to see how many you missed and where those misses occurred. 

Not only does that lead to some understandable uncertainty when it comes to reviewing your performance, but it also raises the fairly obvious question of, "Why?" Why does LSAC choose to keep one test a year* a complete secret when the others are all provided for free to those who took it and ultimately available for purchase by anyone? The answer: reuse. Nondisclosed exams allow LSAC to readminister them in their entirety as needed, typically for later International, Sabbath Observer, and Make Up test dates. (And in all likelihood the upcoming July 2018 exam**)

Fortunately, while these tests aren't out "in the wild," a fair amount of information about them is still publicly-available online...information that I've taken the time to compile into a single, handy post below. So here's everything we can share*** about the February LSATs from 2016 all the way back to 2008:

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Topics: LSAT Prep

LSAT cancellations, withdrawals, absences: What's the difference?

Posted by PowerScore Test Preparation on

With the LSAT just around the corner, you may be taking a look at how your prep is going and thinking that you are simply not ready for the test. There's no shame in this; in fact, knowing when you are or are not ready for the LSAT shows a great deal of self-awareness and respect for your law school application. 

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Topics: LSAT Prep

The Ultimate Test Mentality Resource List

Posted by Dave Killoran on

With the LSAT right around the corner, during the final stretch you should make sure you are as mentally well-prepared as possible for the pressures of test day. To help you reach a state of pure mental power and balance, I've compiled a list of my favorite LSAT confidence resources. Make sure to set aside some time before the test to think about how you will approach the LSAT when it begins, and especially how you will react if you encounter any difficulties. It's an essential step, and one that can dramatically impact your score. Here's the list:

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Topics: LSAT Test Mentality, LSAT Prep

The Ultimate Guide to the LSAT Writing Sample

Posted by Jon Denning on

Your LSAT score is the result of your performance on a predetermined collection of multiple-choice tasks: two scored sections of Logical Reasoning, one scored section of Reading Comprehension, and one scored section of Analytical Reasoning (better known as Logic Games). In addition to those four, there will also be a fifth, unscored multiple-choice section known as the Experimental, which will present another of the three types—either a third LR, second RC, or second LG. These five sections can appear in any order, and are largely unpredictable as you work your way through the exam.

But that's not the entirety of your test day.

What many fail to realize, or at the very least fail to fully understand, is that official LSATs also contain a sixth section, given in a separate test booklet and administered after the completion of the five sections described above: the Writing Sample. And it's this final section that I want to talk about today.

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Topics: LSAT Prep

June 2018 Reading Comprehension Recap

Posted by Eric Ockert on

June 2018 is here, and a bit early this year. Hopefully this year's test went well for everyone. Whether you are taking one of the upcoming tests or are just looking to see how things played out in June, we have some initial thoughts about this most recent installment. So, without further ado, let's get right to the breakdown of each of the passages and then a few thoughts.

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Topics: LSAT Reading Comprehension, LSAT Prep

June 2018 LSAT Logical Reasoning Recap

Posted by Jonathan Evans on


Complete Breakdown

Last Friday the LSAC released the June LSAT scores and the latest test. We've been busy evaluating its features and preparing our analysis for you. In this article, we will break down the Logical Reasoning (LR) sections, point out the most important features, and compare them to other recent LR sections and LSAT norms. 

What were the most notable features of the June LR sections?

  • Continued importance of Point at Issue questions
  • Difficult conditional reasoning. The first LR section had a hard Must Be True question that tested a precise interpretation of a necessary condition. There was also a challenging contrapositive on a Parallel the Reasoning question.
  • Conditional reasoning also more common in June than in December.
  • Average number of Weaken and Strengthen questions. Continued importance of Principle-Strengthen questions.
  • Two Main Point questions, but a couple Must Be True questions that tested an implicit main point.
Read below for further discussion and statistics about the questions.
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Topics: LSAT Logical Reasoning, LSAT Prep

An Open Letter to LSAC About LSAT Score Release Times

Posted by Dave Killoran on

Hi LSAC, I hope everyone there is doing well! We just went through the June LSAT score release, and I wanted to share some of my thoughts and the thoughts of many students I spoke to. Let me start by saying that we all appreciate you moving up the score release timeline a bit, and then (sort of) sticking to the announced release date. That definitely helped ease concerns a bit! However, you also made a decision this past round that I think will have many adverse effects going forward, and I'd like to suggest you make a change for future release dates.

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Topics: LSAT Prep