What Does it Mean to "Go Grey" on LSAT Score Release Day?

    Posted by Jon Denning on

    One of the most common talking points you'll hear leading up to an LSAT score releaseand incessantly on the day scores become availableis the notion of "going grey." In fact a hysterical flurry of "I'M  GREY!!" announcements on twitter and elsewhere is one of the most reliable predictors that scores are imminent.

    So what's all this grey business about, and how can you determine your own color status?

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    Topics: LSAT Prep

    Should you take the January LSAT?

    Posted by PowerScore Test Preparation on

    The short answer is: Yes, you probably should. 

    True, there are some disadvantages. First, it's administered in the dead of winter and it's nondisclosed, meaning the test content is not made available after the fact. But consider this: the January test may be your best—and last—chance to get the score you need and still apply for admission in the fall of 2019. Virtually every law school will accept scores from this test as you'll see in our survey of the top 100 law school LSAT deadlines

    And if you're planning to start in the fall of 2020? You'll be well ahead of the game and can have your applications ready for submission as soon as schools begin accepting them next fall. You'll also have plenty of time for a retake if you need, or feel you can attain, a few more points!

    Admittedly, this may sound like somewhat self-serving advice: we'd certainly love to have you work with us, whether you take one of our Winter Full Length or Live Online LSAT classes (starting mid-December!), sign up for a tutoring package, or spend a few months using our On Demand LSAT Course. Nevertheless, even if you don't spend another dime on prep, you should consider the January test to be a viable retake option if you believe there is any room for improvement. 

    So let's look a little more closely at why the January test is worth considering:

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    Topics: LSAT Prep, Law School Admissions

    Who Should Retake the LSAT?

    Posted by Dave Killoran on

    One of the most common questions we receive is about whether one should retake the LSAT. Students want to know if they should retake the test, and if so, how they should study for that retake. Here, we discuss who should retake the LSAT and why (and next time we'll discuss how to go about properly preparing for a retake).

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    Topics: Law School Admissions, LSAT Prep

    Why Does It Take So Long For LSAT Scores To Come Out?

    Posted by Dave Killoran on

    The November LSAT was administered about 10 days ago, and the scores from that test aren't slated to be released until another 11 days from now. Once the LSAT is over, one of the most common complaints is that scores should come out more quickly. Given that we live in an era where tests are electronically scored and the results are transmitted nearly instantly by email, that sounds like a very reasonable complaint. So, why does it take so long for LSAT scores to appear? And couldn't they get them out a lot earlier?

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    Topics: LSAT Prep

    Black Friday/Cyber Monday Sale on LSAT courses and books!

    Posted by PowerScore Test Preparation on

    Give yourself or your future-lawyer loved one the gift of a better LSAT score.

    Yes, we know your inbox is full of Black Friday deals, but will a new pair of shoes help you get into your dream law school? We don't think so!

    Don't miss your chance to prepare for the LSAT with help from our expert instructors and authors, and save some money doing so. How much? We're talking 40% off our new 2019 LSAT Bibles and Workbooks, and up to $200 off our LSAT courses. Act fast because these deals only last for 4 days! Keep reading for the details...

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    Topics: LSAT Prep

    Watch the LSAT/Law School Admissions Q&A Webinar with PowerScore and Spivey Consulting!

    Posted by PowerScore Test Preparation on

    With the November LSAT just taking place and the law school admissions cycle in full swing, we got together recently with our friends at Spivey Consulting and hosted a special, free webinar on 11/19/18 for students to receive expert pointers during this crucial time. Dave Killoran and Jon Denning from PowerScore, and Mike Spivey, Karen Buttenbaum, and Derek Meeker from Spivey Consulting covered a variety of topics relating to the November test and law school application best practices, while also fielding the attendee's individual questions about their specific application goals and time frames. If you missed out, don't worry! We have a recording of the full webinar session available for you to watch below. 

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    Topics: Webinar, LSAT Prep, Law School Admissions, prelaw

    This Thanksgiving, Be Grateful for the LSAT

    Posted by Nikki Siclunov on

    In a piece he published in the NYTimes, Artur Brooks argues that acting grateful can actually make you grateful. We have long been conditioned to believe that gratitude is not real unless it is sincere, but new research shows that emotional authenticity is somewhat overrated. Apparently, an article in the journal Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience identified a variation in a gene (CD38) associated with gratitude, suggesting that we can actively choose to practice gratitude, and become happier as a result. The power of positive thinking at work, as it were, which is something we've been saying for years.

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    Topics: LSAT Prep

    What Should I Do While I Wait For My LSAT Scores To Be Released?

    Posted by Jon Denning on

    The past few weeks have been an unrelenting stew of emotions for recent LSAT takers: relief to be through it, anxiety about how you performed, and sleepless nights waiting on your results.

    For a lot of people—and fingers crossed you're among them—the LSAT is a memory, and prep books and course materials can be discarded as you see fit. For others, it didn't go as well as hoped, that fact is clear, and you're going to have to retake without question.

    But what about those on the fence? What should you do if your retake is score-dependent and you've got another week or so without the information needed to make your decision?

    Limbo's no fun but it doesn't have to be squandered. Let me give you some brief advice on how to best spend that time.

     

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    Topics: LSAT Prep

    LSAT cancellations, withdrawals, absences: What's the difference?

    Posted by PowerScore Test Preparation on

    With the LSAT just around the corner, you may be taking a look at how your prep is going and thinking that you are simply not ready for the test. There's no shame in this; in fact, knowing when you are or are not ready for the LSAT shows a great deal of self-awareness and respect for your law school application. 

    If you know you're not ready for the test, then there are a number of options available to you. We'll discuss each of them in detail so that you have all the information necessary to make the best decision on or before test day.

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    Topics: LSAT Prep