How To Get The Most Out Of LSAT Private Tutoring

Posted by PowerScore Test Preparation on

As you head down the home stretch for the September LSAT, you may be thinking about whether you should invest in private tutoring. It's a common question, and for many students a perfect solution to achieve that final score push just before test day. It's also--and this is coming from someone who has watched the progress of countless LSAT tutoring students--incredibly fulfilling: you get to truly connect with someone entirely dedicated to helping make your unique goals attainable.

A question that most people have when they consider whether to invest in tutoring is what they can expect from their PowerScore tutor. The short answer is "a lot." You're paying for a top-flight, premium service. Even more than that, at PowerScore our first two Core Values are: 1) to deliver the best test preparation imaginable; and 2) to connect with every customer and provide killer service. Your PowerScore tutor will do everything possible to meet, and exceed, those two promises.

That said, this post is really about your role as a tutoring student. What should you do to get the most out of your tutoring experience?

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Topics: LSAT Prep

What Does it Mean to "Go Grey" on LSAT Score Release Day?

Posted by Jon Denning on

One of the most common talking points you'll hear leading up to an LSAT score releaseand incessantly on the day scores become availableis the notion of "going grey." In fact a hysterical flurry of "I'M  GREY!!" announcements on twitter and elsewhere is one of the most reliable predictors that scores are imminent.

So what's all this grey business about, and how can you determine your own color status?

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Topics: LSAT Prep

Should You Do Warm Up Questions The Morning Of The LSAT?

Posted by Dave Killoran on

A question I often receive is, “Should I do a set of warm up questions the morning of the LSAT to get into the right frame of mind?" The idea is that by doing questions prior to the start of the LSAT you will be ready to hit the ground running once the test begins, and that will produce the best possible score. In theory it sounds like a good idea, but does it really work, and should you try it?

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Topics: LSAT Test Mentality, LSAT Prep

February 2008-2016 LSAT Details

Posted by Jon Denning on

Of the various LSAT administrations offered each year, the most mysterious and often confounding for attendees has traditionally been February. The reason for this is that the February exam is nondisclosed: LSAC only releases your final score and its percentile, so you won't receive a copy of the test itself, the scoring scale, or your answer sheet to see how many you missed and where those misses occurred. 

Not only does that lead to some understandable uncertainty when it comes to reviewing your performance, but it also raises the fairly obvious question of, "Why?" Why does LSAC choose to keep one test a year* a complete secret when the others are all provided for free to those who took it and ultimately available for purchase by anyone? The answer: reuse. Nondisclosed exams allow LSAC to readminister them in their entirety as needed, typically for later International, Sabbath Observer, and Make Up test dates. (And in all likelihood the upcoming July 2018 exam**)

Fortunately, while these tests aren't out "in the wild," a fair amount of information about them is still publicly-available online...information that I've taken the time to compile into a single, handy post below. So here's everything we can share*** about the February LSATs from 2016 all the way back to 2008:

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Topics: LSAT Prep

LSAT cancellations, withdrawals, absences: What's the difference?

Posted by PowerScore Test Preparation on

With the LSAT just around the corner, you may be taking a look at how your prep is going and thinking that you are simply not ready for the test. There's no shame in this; in fact, knowing when you are or are not ready for the LSAT shows a great deal of self-awareness and respect for your law school application. 

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Topics: LSAT Prep