Everything Counts

Posted by Jonathan Evans on


Have you ever seen this formula?

What about this one?These are combinatorial formulas, used to solve counting problems, and if you’ve been preparing for the GRE, you might be familiar with them as the formulas for permutations and combinations, two of the most misunderstood and most fun concepts tested in the Quantitative Reasoning section.

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Topics: GMAT, GRE prep, Quantitative, Grad School Admissions

GRE Geometry: Inscribed Squares Hide Right Triangles

Posted by Vicki Wood on

A square that fits snugly inside a circle is inscribed in the circle. The square's corners will touch, but not intersect, the circle's boundary, and the square's diagonal will equal the circle's diameter. Also, as is true of any square's diagonal, it will equal the hypotenuse of a 45°-45°-90° triangle. GRE questions about squares inscribed in circles are really questions about the hypotenuse of this hidden right triangle.

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Topics: GRE prep, Quantitative

Key Steps to Success on GRE Verbal

Posted by Jonathan Evans on


The Big Picture

In last week's post, we discussed three key elements of success on GRE Quant. To recap, there are many worthwhile and effective strategies and approaches to Quant problems, but there are principles that underlie a great deal of success on Quant. The principles discussed comprised three different ways to approach Quant problems and the importance of practicing these approaches. You should read that post too! 

This week, we will continue this discussion of core principles of GRE test-taking success with our discussion of an overall framework or approach to GRE Verbal problems. Read below to find out more. 

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Topics: Verbal, GRE prep

Improve on GRE Quant: Easy as 1, 2, 3!

Posted by Jonathan Evans on


The Best Way to Prepare for GRE Quant

Ready to start studying for GRE Quant, but don't know where to begin? As we've discussed in our GRE prep classes an in our Webinars, the GRE is not a "Math" test per se. Knowledge of core math principles and how and where to apply them is a crucial element of success on the GRE, but this knowledge is by no means sufficient to guarantee a great score. 

Instead, to take Quant scores to the next level, it is crucial to practice and implement effective problem-solving, reasoning skills. One of the foundations of success on GRE Quant is to learn what these tools are and perfect them during your preparation. 

In this post we will distill practice for Quant problems down to three key principles.

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Topics: GRE prep

GRE Arithmetic: Translating Percentage Problems

Posted by Vicki Wood on

Percentage questions on the GRE often use words and phrases in place of mathematical operators and expressions. To find the answers, just translate the relevant English into the required math. Call this solution strategy translation.

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Topics: GRE prep, Quantitative

Keep Your Admissions Organized with the Grad Tracker

Posted by Jonathan Evans on


Make Grad School Admissions Less Complicated

When you're applying to grad school, one school just isn't enough. Somewhere between five and ten is a more sensible number to apply to. It's also a more difficult number to keep track of. Grad school applications tend to have several parts, and different grad schools can have different requirements.  But there's an easy way to stay on top of it all.

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Topics: Grad School Admissions

Question of the Week: Supplying Numbers

Posted by Jonathan Evans on


Algebra or Arithmetic?

Math on GRE Quant can be broken down into four categories:

  • Arithmetic and Number Properties
  • Algebra
  • Geometry
  • Data Interpretation and Statistics

While algebra may be a distinct topic on the GRE, there is considerable overlap between algebra and the other areas tested, and incorporating algebra into geometry or data interpretation questions is a common way to make these questions more difficult. 

In a previous post we discussed how to try out the answers to find one that satisfied the conditions in the problem. In this post, we'll discuss how to turn even complicated algebra into more straightforward arithmetic: Supplying Numbers™. There are two benefits to this strategy:

  1. Eliminate common algebraic errors and increase accuracy
  2. Work through complicated problems quickly

While it is possible to supply numbers in different ways depending on the problem, the basic process is as follows:

  1. Evaluate the problem to identify whether it involves algebra, either explicit (as formulas, etc.) or implicit (as a word problem that needs to be converted to an expression).
  2. Determine whether you may supply any missing values. Pick appropriate, easy numbers. Look at the rest of the problem to see what numbers might work best.
  3. Work through the problem with your numbers to determine the answer.
  4. Test out the answer choices to see which one works.

Read below to see an example of this process at work.

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Topics: GRE prep, question of the week, GRE Challenge

Question of the Week: Backplugging

Posted by Jonathan Evans on


Try Out the Answers!

Check out the Question of the Week:

Attempt the question; then read the explanation below.

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Topics: GRE prep, GRE Challenge

How to Prep for the GRE on a Tight Schedule

Posted by Jonathan Evans on

Plan Ahead to Succeed

GRE students are a diverse group. "Non-traditional" students are the tradition in GRE preparation. Whether you're a working parent, a recent college graduate, a professional seeking an advanced degree, someone seeking a career change, an academic, or any combination of the above, you will fit right in with other GRE students. 

One of the greatest challenges for people with existing responsibilities is to find the time to prepare successfully for the GRE while staying on top of your job, family, application process, and all the complexities of life. 

In this post, we'll discuss a step-by-step approach to success with the GRE using readily available resources.

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Topics: GRE prep, GRE

Penn Law First to Accept GMAT for Law School Admissions

Posted by Jonathan Evans on

Pilot Program May Have Implications for Other Law Programs

Since early this year, the ABA has continued to move forward with eliminating the accreditation standard mandating that schools use a standardized test in admissions, a proposal adopted in committee that now awaits adoption by the ABA House of Delegates. In a nutshell, this means that law schools would no longer need to require any standardized test for admissions. While some law schools might dispense with not only the LSAT but also standardized testing altogether, these schools will be the exception; instead, many law schools may follow the example of the University of Pennsylvania and the eighteen other law schools that accept the GRE for admissions

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Topics: lsat, GRE, GMAT, Law School Admissions, Business School Admissions, Grad School Admissions