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Using the PowerScore LSAT Bibles: Three Month Self-Study Plan

  
  

 

describe the image An updated version of this post, for the February 2014 LSAT, appears here.

Students often ask about combining the LSAT Bibles when they are self-studying, and I addressed some of those questions here, and we also have a free self-study guide. Although our book websites contain general study plans, here’s a more detailed plan for someone starting about 12 weeks out from the LSAT (which is often when people start studying). The plan assumes you have our three LSAT Bibles, our first Training Type Series (which includes LSAT PrepTests 1 through 20), and a plethora of actual LSATs, including the SuperPrep and all of the recent exams.   

General thoughts

Studying for the LSAT is about consistency and diligence. This is not a test you can cram for, so don’t put in one hour a week and then try to study forty hours a week in the last two weeks. Instead, get into a regular schedule where you study a minimum of ten hours a week (and hopefully much more!).

Three months seems like a long time, but once you get rolling with your studies, it won’t seem long at all. But, it is enough time that I will assume you can read all three LSAT Bibles. If you already are extremely strong in one of the areas—say, Reading Comprehension—you can omit portions of the plan devoted to that section.

Week 1: Twelve weeks to the LSAT

Start by taking the June 2007 LSAT (available free from Law Services here) under timed conditions. Do this in order to establish a baseline score. Use the free test proctor in our Free LSAT Help Area to time yourself, and then score and review the test using the Free LSAT Score Analyzer. The Analyzer will help you identify your strengths and weaknesses, and help you shape your studies.

Spend the rest of the week relaxing. No, just kidding! Instead, watch the free Lesson One from our LSAT Virtual Course in our Free LSAT Help Area, and then read Chapters One through Six of the LSAT Logical Reasoning Bible. This reading selection gets you through Conditional Reasoning, which will figure heavily in both the Logical Reasoning and Logic Games sections of the LSAT.

As you read Chapters Four, Five, and Six in the LSAT Logical Reasoning Bible, complete Chapters Two and Three in LSAT Logical Reasoning: Question Type Training. These two chapters present Must Be True and Main Point questions, which figure prominently in both the Logical Reasoning and Reading Comprehension sections.

Week 2: Eleven weeks to the LSAT

Read Chapters Two and Three of the LSAT Logic Games Bible. Complete Chapters Two and Three of LSAT Game Type Training, which contains the same game types that are covered in the Logic Games Bible chapters.

Read Chapters Seven and Eight of the Logical Reasoning Bible. Complete Chapter Four of LSAT Logical Reasoning: Question Type Training.

Week 3: Ten weeks to the LSAT

Read Chapters Two and Three of the LSAT Reading Comprehension Bible. Skip the section in Chapter Two that covers argumentation (pages 32-40).

Read Chapters Nine and Ten of the Logical Reasoning Bible. Complete Chapters Five, Six, and Seven of LSAT Logical Reasoning: Question Type Training.

Read Chapter Four of the LSAT Logic Games Bible. Complete Chapter Four of LSAT Game Type Training.

Week 4: Nine weeks to the LSAT

This is a bit of a lighter week, in order to let some of the ideas settle in.

Read Chapters Four, Five, and Six of the LSAT Reading Comprehension Bible. Complete the first half of Chapter Nine in LSAT Reading Comprehension: Passage Type Training.

Read Chapter Eleven of the Logical Reasoning Bible. Complete Chapter Nineteen of LSAT Logical Reasoning: Question Type Training. However, if you are falling behind in your studying, skip this item entirely.

Read Chapter Five of the LSAT Logic Games Bible. Complete Chapter Five of LSAT Game Type Training.

Week 5: Eight weeks to the LSAT

Read Chapters Six and Seven of the LSAT Logic Games Bible. Complete Chapter Six and Seven of LSAT Game Type Training.

Read Chapters Twelve and Thirteen of the Logical Reasoning Bible. Complete Chapters Nine and Ten of LSAT Logical Reasoning: Question Type Training.

Read Chapters Seven and Eight of the LSAT Reading Comprehension Bible. Complete the second half of Chapter Nine in LSAT Reading Comprehension: Passage Type Training.

Take PrepTest A from the SuperPrep as a timed exercise. Thereafter, review your performance and read the question explanations in the SuperPrep. They are by no means the best possible explanations (they don’t want to give away the farm in terms of strategy explanations), but they give you a sense of the things that the test makers identify as important when they analyze questions.

Week 6: Seven weeks to the LSAT

Read Chapters Eight and Nine of the LSAT Logic Games Bible. Complete Chapter Eight of LSAT Game Type Training. Complete Chapter Two of the LSAT Logic Games Bible Workbook.

Read Chapter Fourteen and Fifteen of the Logical Reasoning Bible. Complete Chapters Eleven and Eighteen of LSAT Logical Reasoning: Question Type Training.

Read Chapters Seven and Eight of the LSAT Reading Comprehension Bible. Complete the second half of Chapter Nine in LSAT Reading Comprehension: Passage Type Training.

Take PrepTest 43 as a timed exercise (Consider using the copy of the test in Three LSATs Deconstructed because that book also contains complete explanations for the test). Use section 1 from PrepTest 36 as an experimental section.

Week 7: Six weeks to the LSAT

At this point you have reviewed a number of the major concepts, so timing starts to take a greater role in your preparation.

Read Chapter Sixteen through Twenty of the Logical Reasoning Bible. Complete Chapter Two of the LSAT Logical Reasoning Bible Workbook. Complete Chapters Twelve through Fifteen of LSAT Logical Reasoning: Question Type Training.

Read Chapters Nine and Ten of the LSAT Reading Comprehension Bible. Complete Chapter One in LSAT Reading Comprehension: Passage Type Training.

Take PrepTest 44 as a timed exercise (Consider using the copy of the test in Three LSATs Deconstructed because that book also contains complete explanations for the test). Use section 2 from PrepTest 36 as an experimental section.

Week 8: Five weeks to the LSAT

Complete Chapters Sixteen and Seventeen of LSAT Logical Reasoning: Question Type Training. Complete the first half of Chapter Three of the LSAT Logical Reasoning Bible Workbook.

Complete Chapters Two, Three, and Four in LSAT Reading Comprehension: Passage Type Training.

Take PrepTest B from the SuperPrep as a timed exercise. Thereafter, review your performance and read the question explanations in the SuperPrep.

Take PrepTest 45 as a timed exercise (Consider using the copy of the test in Three LSATs Deconstructed because that book also contains complete explanations for the test). Use section 3 from PrepTest 36 as an experimental section.

Week 9: Four weeks to the LSAT

Complete Chapters Five and Six in LSAT Reading Comprehension: Passage Type Training.

The focus now moves to working through as many tests as possible under timed conditions, in order to accustom you to the rigors of the LSAT.

Complete Chapter Eleven of the LSAT Reading Comprehension Bible as a timed exercise. Review the explanations.

Take PrepTest 49 as a timed exercise. Use section 1 and 2 from PrepTest 37 as two experimental sections, in order to “overdrive” your testing. After taking six-section tests, the real five-section LSAT won’t seem quite as exhausting.

Take PrepTest 50 as a timed exercise. Use section 3 and 4 from PrepTest 37 as two experimental sections.

Take PrepTest 51 as a timed exercise (Consider using the copy of the test in December 2006 LSAT Deconstructed because that book also contains a complete explanation for the test). Use section 1 and 2 from PrepTest 38 as two experimental sections.

Week 10: Three weeks to the LSAT

Complete Chapters Seven and Eight in LSAT Reading Comprehension: Passage Type Training.

Review specific chapters from the Bibles that cover concepts that are still causing issues for you.

If Games continue to trouble you, complete Chapter Three of the LSAT Logic Games Bible Workbook. Do each game as a timed exercise, but know that you will have encountered some of the games previously. This is not a problem—reviewing games multiple times is quite beneficial.

Take PrepTest 52 as a timed exercise. Use section 3 and 4 from PrepTest 38 as two experimental sections.

Take PrepTest 53 as a timed exercise. Use section 1 and 2 from PrepTest 40 as two experimental sections.

Take PrepTest 54 as a timed exercise. Use section 3 and 4 from PrepTest 40 as two experimental sections.

Week 11: Two weeks to the LSAT

Take PrepTest C from the SuperPrep as a timed exercise. Thereafter, review your performance and read the question explanations in the SuperPrep.

Take PrepTest 55 as a timed exercise. Use sections 1 and 2 from PrepTest 46 as two experimental sections.

Take PrepTest 56 as a timed exercise. Use sections 3 and 4 from PrepTest 46 as two experimental sections.

Take PrepTest 57 as a timed exercise. Use sections 1 and 2 from PrepTest 47 as two experimental sections.

Week 12: One week to the LSAT

If Games continue to trouble you, complete Chapter Four of the LSAT Logic Games Bible Workbook. Do each section as a timed exercise, but know that you will have encountered some of the games previously. This is not a problem—reviewing games multiple times is quite beneficial.

Take PrepTest 58 as a timed exercise. Use sections 3 and 4 from PrepTest 47 as two experimental sections.

Take PrepTest 59 as a timed exercise. Use sections 1 and 2 from PrepTest 48 as two experimental sections.

Take PrepTest 60 as a timed exercise. Use sections 3 and 4 from PrepTest 48 as two experimental sections.

The day before the exam, relax!


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Comments

Great
Posted @ Saturday, April 20, 2013 10:48 AM by Chantay Jordan
hi, 
 
Which one of these books is recommended for beginners who have zero experience and knowledge of what to expect on the LSAT. I bought Kaplan books but they confused me.
Posted @ Sunday, July 28, 2013 4:19 PM by Amna
Hi, to start with, you should get the three LSAT Bibles. Those are the best-selling LSAT strategy guides on the market, and they explain the concepts behind the questions and the best methods for attacking those questions.  
 
To understand the different books we publish, check out this blog post: http://blog.powerscore.com/lsat/bid/279283/The-LSAT-Bibles-vs-The-LSAT-Bible-Workbooks-vs-The-LSAT-Training-Type-Books. There, I explain the difference between the LSAT Bibles, the LSAT Bible Workbooks, and the Training Type books. But, the best starting point is the three LSAT Bibles. 
 
Please let me know if that helps. Thanks!
Posted @ Sunday, July 28, 2013 4:24 PM by Dave Killoran
Hi! I had an UGPA of 2.48 in International Business in 2003 then Graduate studies in Project Management with 4.0 (2006) and Paralegal Diploma 3.5 (2011). I want to go to UCLA. Can you tell me a good score I shoot aim for to get accepted?
Posted @ Monday, September 30, 2013 9:27 PM by Lionel
Hi Lionel, 
 
Thanks for the question. The bad news is that the law schools will focus primarily on your undergraduate GPA, meaning that the 2.48 will be the main number they use, not the 4.0 or 3.5.  
 
To have a chance of being accepted, you need to offset that lower GPA as much as possible. That would require a score in the 170s, and really the upper 170s.  
 
Is there any explanation for the 2.48 that might compel the admissions committee to downplay that number? For example, did you get sick while in college, or have a family member become ill? 
 
Thanks!
Posted @ Tuesday, October 01, 2013 7:53 AM by Dave Killoran
Thank you for your advices and I was thinking of the same high score for the LSAT and I will devote the next four months to study & practice it. 
 
My GPA was really affected due to two classes notoriously hard at my university: Microeconomics and Production Operations and I received "D" for both classes. Moreover, my grand-mother passed away on May 1 2001 and it did affect my studying for the Finance exam which I had to defer and I received another "D". However, after my undergrad studies, I became more mature and were able to have a rewarding career in marketing research and also to develop other studying strategies. 
 
That's really my sincere feedback. 
 
Lionel
Posted @ Tuesday, October 01, 2013 9:55 AM by Lionel
Hi Lionel, 
 
Thanks for that information! what I would do is write an extra addendum that focuses solely on explaining your GPA (cite the family issue there), and your subsequent growth as a student (as evidenced by your excellent post-grad GPAs). This will help to minimize the number.  
 
UCLA appears to have accepted one or two people with sub-3.0 GPAs last year, and both had 170+ LSATs, so that should be your goal. 
 
Thanks and good luck!
Posted @ Tuesday, October 01, 2013 1:48 PM by Dave Killoran
Thank you for your kind words and sound advices Dave! 
 
Thanks again! 
 
Posted @ Tuesday, October 01, 2013 4:02 PM by Lionel
Hello Dave: 
 
A friend gave me the preptest #7-57 with their respective explanations. Do you think I can start to study with those preptest and buy after the list you suggested OR studying only with those preptests will be enough? 
 
Thank you for all your help! 
Posted @ Sunday, October 06, 2013 3:03 PM by JL
Hi JL, 
 
Thanks for the question. If you have all of those PrepTests, then much of the list above becomes unnecessary. However, I would still recommend purchasing the three main LSAT Bibles for LG, LR, and RC. The reason is that those books provide the conceptual foundation for attacking each section. With those strategies and methods in hand, doing the questions becomes easier, recognizing patterns becomes possible, and understanding any explanation becomes easier. Without a strategic foundation, you will be left trying to piece everything together on your own. That will take a lot more studying, and there's no guarantee you will get every base covered. Essentially, then, having the three LSAT Bibles gives you the tools you need to make sense of all of the questions you are doing.  
 
Please let me know if that helps, or if you have any fruther questions. Thanks! 
 
 
 
Posted @ Sunday, October 06, 2013 4:18 PM by Dave Killoran
Thank you, Dave. 
 
My friend did gave me also the three bibles you referred. 
 
Also, I will take also the in-class Powerscore course. Do you think allocating 20-30 hours per week of studying+ class attendance will be enough? 
 
Thank you so much! 
Posted @ Sunday, October 06, 2013 5:07 PM by JL
Hi JL, 
 
That is a good friend to have indeed!  
 
Yes, 20-30 hours is a very good amount of time in addition to the class. You'll be in great shape with that setup.  
 
Thanks and enjoy the class!
Posted @ Sunday, October 06, 2013 6:51 PM by Dave Killoran
Thank you very much!
Posted @ Sunday, October 06, 2013 6:58 PM by JL
Hello Dave, 
 
I registered for the LSAT for February 2014. However, if I am ready for the December 2013 exam, would you recommend I take the exam in Toronto which is the next day I booked a trip there or to wait for February 2014 as currently scheduled? 
 
Many thanks. 
 
JL
Posted @ Monday, October 28, 2013 11:42 AM by JL
Hi JL, 
 
If you are ready for the December 2013 LSAT, then definitely take it then. It's best to take the exam when you feel properly prepared and ready. 
 
I'm not certain what you mean about Toronto--would you ahve to take the test there? If so, do you think that would throw you off your game? 
 
Please let me know. Thanks!
Posted @ Monday, October 28, 2013 11:55 AM by Dave Killoran
Thank you for the response, Dave. 
 
Actually, if I take the LSAT in December, I will have to take it in Toronto since I will arrive on December 6 at 10:30pm. 
 
I know it's very important to have a good night of sleep and I think I will only have 6 hours of sleep if I take the LSAT in December. 
 
Thank you for your advice! 
Posted @ Monday, October 28, 2013 12:21 PM by JL
Hmm, that's a dilemma. You are balancing a lessened amount of sleep vs waiting two more months. Do you feel like that trade comes out on one side or the other? Could you use the extra two months to study mote and do even better? And, are any application deadlines affected by waiting? 
 
I guess I should also ask of that Toronoto trip is necessary :) 
 
Thanks!
Posted @ Monday, October 28, 2013 12:45 PM by Dave Killoran
Thank you for your other questions. 
 
I'm going to Toronto for my friend's son brit milah and Saturday was my first LSAT class. 
 
I will apply to Law school next year and not this year and my plan was to study a good three months seriously for the LSAT. 
 
Thanks!
Posted @ Monday, October 28, 2013 12:50 PM by JL
Hi JL, 
 
Ok, that makes sense. It sounds to me like taking the LSAT in February won't be a strain at all, so I might push it back, but the decision is obviously yours.  
 
Good luck!
Posted @ Monday, October 28, 2013 2:34 PM by Dave Killoran
Hi again! 
 
I will take the exam in February definitely.  
 
Thank you for your sound advice Dave! 
Posted @ Monday, October 28, 2013 5:31 PM by JL
Sounds good! Glad I could help. Thanks!
Posted @ Monday, October 28, 2013 8:08 PM by Dave Killoran
Hi, 
 
I took the Powerscore course from August 7 to early October, and since self studied with the Powerscore material from class and the 3 Powerscore bibles, an Ace the Games book, and have all the past lsat but have not done all of them still yet.  
 
I took the diagnostic cold from Powerscore and received a 143 on August 7. Since last week though, I've been hitting the low 160s (a 19-20 point increase).  
 
I put in about 5-6 hours everyday, and I'm taking the upcoming dec lsat.  
 
I was wondering if you think it is possible for me to score a 169-170 by that time? 
 
If I don't score that I receive lets say a 167, is it still possible to get into georgetown and cornell? I have a 3.68 gpa.  
 
Thanks for your anticipated response and sorry for such a capacious question.
Posted @ Tuesday, November 05, 2013 3:38 PM by Thomas
Hi, 
 
Thanks for the question, and congrtats on the great score increase! It very well could be possible--I need to ask you a few additional questions to get a better sense of what's possible. Do you think you could possibly post this question on our free LSAT forum at http://forum.powerscore.com/lsat/index.php? The Forum has more robust posting tools that will help me respond more comprehensively, and it is a better location for this question than this blog post :) I will also comment on the Gtown question too.  
 
Please let me know if that is ok. Thanks! 
 
Posted @ Tuesday, November 05, 2013 4:26 PM by Dave Killoran
Thanks for the quick response! 
 
I can definitely post my question on the forum; I'm just waiting for Powerscore to send me confirmation on my newly created account. 
 
But to give a little more pertinent information about myself - I miss 4 - 9 (closer to 6-7) questions on RC, 4 - 8 questions on LG, and 4 - 7 (closer to 4-5) questions on my LR.  
 
I am a political science major and psych minor.  
 
When I take practice tests, they usually contain 1-2 questions that I remember from the bibles (LR), usually none of games, and 1-2 passages in RC but never the questions. How reliable are the preptests I take as an indicator of where I am actually at? Three weeks ago, I took a test where none of the questions nor passages were recognizable and got a 159. However, I think I've improved since then.  
Two weeks ago, I took a Kaplan practice test which was administered at my school (UC Irvine) and it was the same as the very first diagnostic test I took at Powerscore.  
I remembered some of the questions on LR, some of the games (although none of the questions), and 3 of the 4 passages in RC (although none of the questions).  
I received a 164 on that test, where I missed 5 on LG, 1 on LR, 3 on LR, and a whopping 11 on RC.  
 
Starting from last week, I've been taking preptests and scoring between 161-164 with the conditions aforementioned.  
 
Thanks for your time.  
 
Posted @ Tuesday, November 05, 2013 6:13 PM by Thomas
Got it--I see your post on the Forum. I'll try to answer tonight, but it may be tomorrow morning before I can complete the answer.  
 
Thanks!
Posted @ Tuesday, November 05, 2013 7:02 PM by Dave Killoran
Hi Thomas, 
 
I answered you in detail over at http://forum.powerscore.com/lsat/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=4666  
 
Thanks!
Posted @ Wednesday, November 06, 2013 10:12 AM by Dave Killoran
Hello, 
I have the LR and LG Powerscore Bibles, the three 10-pack LSAT preptests, and preptests 62-65. Planning to take LSAT in June '14. 
 
On three cold diagnostics, before even cracking the Bibles open, I scored 171, 168, and 170. I'm a little confused re: how to deal with the fact that the Bibles contain sections from the preptests that I'd planned on taking start to finish. If I work my way through them in the Bibles, then I can't simulate an actual full test with the preptests they're pulled from. Is there a recommended course of action for someone in my situation (appx 3 months out, good cold diagnostics, just starting to study)? 
 
Take prep tests, then consult Bibles to review answers? Or treat early prep tests more like workbooks, and save the later preptests for full simulations? 
 
I may post this question elsewhere also, as I'm not sure this is the appropriate place. 
 
thank you! 
 
Posted @ Saturday, March 08, 2014 3:41 AM by Paul
Hi Paul, thanks for the question! One of the things I did with the Bibles was choose questions from tests that weren't the very most recent exams, because so many people use those exclusively for practice tests. At the same time, I strongly wanted to use real questions, so you end up with a situation where it's really hard to avoid PrepTests that someone might have. My suggestion would be that for the tests where you see some very small overlap, those probabyl can still be used as PrepTests. For tests with greater overlap, use those as practice of for esxperimental sections in the tests you take.  
 
As far as the best general approach, read the Bibles first, and then mix in tests. The Bibles are all about strategy, so you want to learn that as soon as possible. And, conveniently, we have a general three-month study plan over at: http://www.powerscore.com/lsat/help/study-plan-for-the-lsat.cfm . We post an updated on on our blog regularly too, at http://blog.powerscore.com/lsat/. You can sub in your tests there for the ones listed.  
 
Last, for all specific LSAT questions, head over to our free LSAT discussion Forum--we answer pretty much everything under the sun that's related to LSAT there! It's at: http://forum.powerscore.com/lsat/index.php 
 
Please let me know if that helps. Thanks! 
Posted @ Saturday, March 08, 2014 12:38 PM by Dave Killoran
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