How To Handle "Even If" In Conditional Reasoning (Even If It Doesn't Matter)

Posted by Eric Ockert on

 

Most students confront conditional reasoning very early on in their LSAT preparation. They spend hours mastering the logic of conditional rules in Logical Reasoning stimuli and answer choices, and in Logic Games as well. To this end, students must memorize a number of common conditional reasoning keywords and phrases that help indicate the presence of this logic. Some of these indicators become incredibly obvious with practice. Many of us can recall a moment when, while working through a previously unseen logical reasoning question, we encounter the all-too-familiar "if....then" construction. With a gleam in our eye and a smile across our face, we confidently say to ourselves, "I've got this," and quickly draw out a perfect diagram of the rule.

But every so often there comes a moment when we see that familiar "if", and, just as our hearts start to warm with recognition, a specter looms on the horizon—standing menacingly in front our old friend "if" . . . the word "even". "Even if". Wait . . . what?

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Topics: LSAT Logical Reasoning, LSAT Conditional Reasoning

Law School Letters of Recommendation: 4 Key Questions Answered

Posted by Dave Killoran on

Recently, US News and World Report contacted PowerScore with questions about the law school admissions process, and specifically about letters of recommendation. Since their final magazine article didn’t use the entirety of our answers, we thought we’d post them here for you to use!

Below are the four main questions we were asked, with each question followed by two separate responses. The first reply is from Dave Killoran, PowerScore’s CEO and co-author of the forthcoming PowerScore Law School Admissions Bible, and the second is from Tony Bates, PowerScore Law School Admissions Consultant.

Here are the four questions and corresponding answers:

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Topics: Law School Admissions

LSAT Logical Reasoning Question Types by Frequency of Appearance

Posted by Jon Denning on

The June LSAT is now 60 days away, and it's inevitable that people will wonder how to best prioritize their study efforts. To aid in that, I've analyzed the past 18 months' worth of released LSATs (back to October 2015) to see exactly what Logical Reasoning concepts the test makers have emphasized, and what they've relegated to a back shelf. After all, if you know the trends on the most recent exams then your own test day holds a lot less mystery.

This post is intended as a continuation of a prior frequency breakdown for LR questions from June 2013 through June 2015, the results of which can be found here.

To start, there are thirteen question types that we recognize in Logical Reasoning, listed in (very) rough order of historical appearance frequency:

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Topics: LSAT Prep

What is Yield Protection in Law School Admissions?

Posted by Daniel Plainview on

In the world of law school admissions, the U.S. News and World Report’s (USNWR) annual law school rankings are always looming, in one way or another, in the background.

For better or worse, the USNWR rankings are the most widely cited, and for many are considered the gospel truth when it comes to law school rankings. They receive heavy criticism along a number of lines. Many criticize them for placing insufficient emphasis on employment outcomes, and too much emphasis on things like library resources and expenditures per student, which favor schools with a lot to spend. Another common complaint is that the rankings are self-reinforcing. 

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Topics: Law School Admissions

Yale Law School To Accept GRE Scores

Posted by Dave Killoran on

Hot on the heels of rival Harvard's decision to accept GRE scores in lieu of LSAT scores, Yale Law School (https://law.yale.edu/) announced this morning that they would be implementing the use of GRE scores in the law school admission process effective immediately. "When we saw Harvard's decision to accept GRE scores, we knew we needed to move quickly to employ a similar policy lest Harvard get ahead of us in the all-important rankings battle," said Yale spokesperson N. Feriority. "We've been #1 for so long that it would be a crippling blow to our self-esteem if we somehow dropped behind Harvard or Stanford."

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Topics: GRE prep, Law School Admissions, LSAT Prep

Non-Traditional Law School Applicants: Old Folks Rule!

Posted by Adam M. Tyson on

When I took the LSAT for the first time, I was 31 years old, 8 years out of college, married, with a 2-year-old son, working full-time at a large non-profit institution, had a mortgage, and was the primary breadwinner in the household. I was, in other words, a “non-traditional” applicant.

Does this sound like you?

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Topics: Grad School Admissions, College Admissions, Law School Admissions

Law Schools with Late Admissions Deadlines

Posted by Dave Killoran on

We recently posted a list of law schools in the Top 50 that accept the June LSAT. A number of students wanted to also see the full list of all schools with late admissions deadlines ("late" in this case means a hard deadline of April 1st or later). Because we called every single law school on this list to confirm our data, this took a while to produce! But, we can now present you with a complete and accurate list of law schools with late 2017 admissions deadlines.

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Topics: Law School Admissions

What 25th and 75th LSAT Score Percentiles Mean for Law School Admissions

Posted by Jon Denning on

With your LSAT score in hand, it's now time to consider what that number means for you in terms of your admissions odds. Everyone knows that an LSAT score is almost universally prized above all other factors--often counting more towards an acceptance than GPA, letters of rec, personal statement, and resume combined! Often, if you can believe it, several times more than that collective "other"--but exactly what does the number you've attained mean to the school (or schools) to which you intend to apply? Let's investigate.

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Topics: Law School Admissions

Do Non-Traditional Law School Applicants Have an Admissions Advantage?

Posted by Daniel Plainview on

Anyone who has been following my posts on the PowerScore blog knows that I’m pretty interested in using data to get insights into not only what factors might affect law school admissions decisions, but also to what degree those factors have an impact, as well as the differences in the ways different facets of an application package do (or do not!) affect admissions decisions at different law schools.

So far, I have explored whether the timing of the application makes a difference, the benefits (or lack thereof) of binding early decision options, which schools are relatively more welcoming of splitter and reverse-splitter candidates, and how an applicant’s ability to claim underrepresented minority status may affect outcomes. In this post we’ll dive into the data to try to get an idea of whether – and how – nontraditional students (or, in common shorthand, NonTrads) fare any differently in law school admissions outcomes.

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Topics: Law School Admissions

Why you should take the LSAT in June (and not in September)

Posted by Nikki Siclunov on


It's almost May. By now, you've probably started a test prep course, bought the Bible Trilogy, and/or invested a considerable amount of money purchasing PrepTests. You may have even started working with a tutor. If you are seeing an uptick in your practice test scores, that's awesome. Chances are, however, that you aren't anywhere near where you hope to be in June.

Soon you will start debating whether to put it all off until September (if you haven't already). It's easy to rationalize such a decision: if you're still in school, you can focus on your finals without the added aggravation of yet another test, arguably more important than any of them. Plus, you'll have the whole summer to study, and besides - what else are you going to do on the beach?

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Topics: LSAT Prep