Advanced LSAT Guessing Strategy: Referring To Prior Answers

Posted by Dave Killoran on

In a perfect world, you'd never have to guess on any question while taking the LSAT. But, there are occasions where time simply runs out, and when that occurs you have to guess (especially because, unlike the SAT, there is no penalty for guessing on the LSAT). I've talked elsewhere about Basic LSAT Guessing Strategy, which is based on answer choice appearance probabilities. As that article discusses, historically some answers are more likely to appear than others, and you can often gain an advantage by knowing those tendencies when the occasion arises. But, are there other guessing strategies you can employ?

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Topics: LSAT Prep

Cognitive Biases in Test Reviews: When Smart People Can Be Stupid

Posted by Nikki Siclunov on

One of the most daunting tasks in any test preparation program, whether undertaken on your own or with an instructor,  is the practice test review. For many, it's an experience that is at once humbling and tedious, likely to repeat itself more than a dozen times over the course of their preparation. To make matters worse, the ideal test review requires more than simply going over the questions you got wrong. Ideally, you should review any question that you answered without confidence, whether you got it right or not. We've written extensively on this topic over the years, and you should probably have the following blog posts bookmarked: 

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Topics: LSAT Prep

The Ultimate Guide to the LSAT Writing Sample

Posted by Jon Denning on

Your LSAT score is the result of your performance on a predetermined collection of multiple-choice tasks: two scored sections of Logical Reasoning, one scored section of Reading Comprehension, and one scored section of Analytical Reasoning (better known as Logic Games). In addition to those four, there will also be a fifth, unscored multiple-choice section known as the Experimental, which will present another of the three types—either a third LR, second RC, or second LG. These five sections can appear in any order, and are largely unpredictable as you work your way through the exam.

But that's not the entirety of your test day.

What many fail to realize, or at the very least fail to fully understand, is that official LSATs also contain a sixth section, given in a separate test booklet and administered after the completion of the five sections described above: the Writing Sample. And it's this final section that I want to talk about today.

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Topics: LSAT Prep

Studying GMAT Critical Reasoning? Consider Using LSAT LR Questions

Posted by Dave Killoran on

Those of you who follow the PowerScore blog know that I most frequently write about the LSAT and law school related topics. However, PowerScore also offers GMAT books, GMAT courses, and GMAT tutoring, and so I spend time in the GMAT world as well. If you've ever studied the GMAT, you know that both the Critical Reasoning (CR) and Reading Comprehension (RC) sections of that test are very similar to the LSAT Logical Reasoning (LR) and Reading Comprehension sections. But whereas the makers of the LSAT have released thousands of questions that can be used for studying, the makers of the GMAT have released relatively few questions overall (there are just three Official Guides, and the GMAT Prep software contains basically two GMATs. Aside from three sets of "retired" paper tests, that's about it). Thus, GMAT students often run out of questions when studying, leaving them at a loss especially if they struggle with CR or RC. However, there is an excellent solution.

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Topics: LSAT Prep

Six Key Tips to Help You Score Better Than Your Classmates

Posted by Nikki Siclunov on

There is little doubt that prep courses give you the most bang for your buck, and it's no surprise that they are an extremely popular way of preparing to take the LSAT. According to LSAC's own research report, students who use official LSAC test-preparation materials (i.e. PrepTests), non-LSAC books (such as the Bible Trilogy) and commercial test-prep courses tend to have higher scores than those who did not use such methods. Most students, LSAC reports, use more than one of these methods, so if you're studying the Bibles before your summer course begins, you are not alone. 

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Topics: LSAT Prep

Considering an LSAT Retake? Here's What the Experts Say!

Posted by Dave Killoran on

June LSAT scores were released a week ago, and since then we've been asked repeatedly about retakes. And that's understandable. Some will receive their scores and know immediately that they need another shot, and others will be fortunate enough to have nailed the test and be done with it forever. But a large segment of students will be in the middle—posting solid-but-not-slam-dunk scores that give them a chance at their target schools but do not guarantee admission. That often leads to a difficult decision period wherein these students struggle to decide if they are going to retake the test or not.

Well I'm here to help clarify that difficult decision with a simple bit of advice: retake it!

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Topics: LSAT Prep

Should You Retake The LSAT?

Posted by Jon Denning on

With the recent release of June LSAT scores, a number of students now find themselves in the somewhat uncomfortable position of a possible retake later this year. With that in mind, I want to take a moment to consider one of the most frequently asked questions regarding law school admissions: "Should I take the LSAT again, and if I do, how will law schools interpret my scores?"

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Topics: LSAT Prep

June LSAT Scores Released—What Comes Next?

Posted by Jon Denning on

With scores from the recently-administered June LSAT released yesterday, a natural and somewhat obvious question arises: what's next? 

The answer to that question largely depends on which of two, or possibly three, categories best describes your situation. Let's examine the scenarios below and discuss what might qualify you for each, and the appropriate actions to take moving forward (one of which inspired my picture choice for this post).

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Topics: Law School Admissions, LSAT Prep