Understanding LSAT Justify the Conclusion/Sufficient Assumption LR Questions

Posted by Dave Killoran on

One of the common questions that comes up with students studying for the LSAT is how do Justify/Sufficient Assumption questions work, and how do they differ from regular Assumption/Necessary Assumption questions? The mere fact that there are different types of assumption questions is part of the problem, but the unique way that these questions work also causes issues. Let's take a closer look at this question type and try to understand the big picture!

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Topics: LSAT Logical Reasoning, LSAT Prep

My LSAT Regimen, Part 3

Posted by Marvin Dike on

Note: PowerScore student Marvin Dike is blogging about his comprehensive and detailed study methodology so that our readers can learn from his experience. Make sure you read Part 1 and Part 2.

Back again for part 3 of the LSAT regimen. I hope you enjoyed part 2 that broke down the best possible way to master Logic Games. Here we are to talk about the skills that are rewarded in Reading Comprehension and Logical Reasoning.

Reading Comprehension

The skill that the LSAT makers reward you for having..... BEYOND understanding VIEWSTAMP and all the wonderful teaching PowerScore has showed us, what they reward you for having is SHORT TERM MEMORY. Now that may seem obvious. And you may think that this skill cannot be strengthened, but it can.

But before I break that down...

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Topics: LSAT Logical Reasoning, LSAT Reading Comprehension, LSAT Prep

June 2017 LSAT Logic Games Explanations: Games 3 and 4

Posted by Jon Denning on

In my post yesterday I provided complete explanations of Games 1 and 2 from the recently-released June 2017 LSAT, and today I'll complete the section by deconstructing Games 3 and 4. If you missed the first article in this set however I encourage you to give it a read before proceeding here, as I also provided an overview of the section and, in particular, what it meant for the test's scoring scale.

As before, I'll outline exactly how to attack each game below, and then provide a direct link to the interactive question explanations on our LSAT Discussion Forum.

Let's take a look at these games:

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Topics: LSAT Logic Games, LSAT Prep

June 2017 LSAT Logic Game Explanations: Games 1 and 2

Posted by Jon Denning on

With the release of the June 2017 LSAT on Wednesday, July 5th, test takers everywhere have been in performance review mode, analyzing what went right and wrong and trying to make as much sense as possible of their results. 

To assist in that, we've released detailed discussions of the Logical Reasoning and Reading Comprehension sections, and even the Scoring Scale, so you can compare your analysis to ours. 

Of course, if you're anything like me then the Logic Games section is top priority for examination, so while these take a little longer to deconstruct I've made it through the first two games and want to share my thoughts on them with you here:

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Topics: LSAT Logic Games, LSAT Prep

My LSAT Prep Regimen, Part 2

Posted by Marvin Dike on

Note: PowerScore student Marvin Dike is blogging about his comprehensive and detailed study methodology so that our readers can learn from his experience. Make sure you read Part 1!

Congrats! You finished the Power Score class or you finished reading all the PowerScore Bibles, so you're ready to take the LSAT soon right?!!?

WRRROOOONNNNGGGGG.

All you have really done is gotten a grasp of the foundational curriculum, you haven't mastered it. You understand conditional logic, you can read a question stem properly, you know how to approach a reading comp passage. Not close to mastering any of it to be honest. If you're okay walking into that test without mastering it then be my guest and best of luck. My 5 year old niece knows how to read and knows how to sound out words but she hasn't *mastered* reading. You have a foundation to build on, so let’s build shall we?

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Topics: LSAT Logic Games, LSAT Prep

What 25th and 75th LSAT Score Percentiles Mean for Law School Admissions

Posted by Jon Denning on

With your LSAT score in hand, it's now time to consider what that number means for you in terms of your admissions odds. Everyone knows that an LSAT score is almost universally prized above all other factors--often counting more towards an acceptance than GPA, letters of rec, personal statement, and resume combined! Often, if you can believe it, several times more than that collective "other"--but exactly what does the number you've attained mean to the school (or schools) to which you intend to apply? Let's investigate.

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Topics: Law School Admissions

June 2017 Reading Comprehension Recap

Posted by Eric Ockert on



Well, the results are in. Overall, the June 2017 Reading Comprehension section proved to follow the general theme found elsewhere on the June 2017 test: the section was fairly average. While the Psychology passage in Passage 2 was challenging, the remaining three passages were all moderate to easy. There were no big surprises with passage positioning, as the easiest two passages were located in Passage 1 and Passage 3, so most test takers probably found enough time to reach both of them. There were seven questions in each of Passage 1, 2, and 4, while Passage 3 only had 6, for a total of 27 questions. The difficulty and types of questions were also fairly balanced throughout although again, Passage 2 seemed to have a bit more of the difficult questions. One interesting anomaly was that every single passage included a Parallel Reasoning question. That equals the four total Parallel questions found on the two Logical Reasoning sections.
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Topics: LSAT Reading Comprehension, LSAT Prep, LSAT Forum

June 2017 LSAT Logical Reasoning Recap

Posted by Jonathan Evans on


DON'T CALL IT A COMEBACK

Grey Day has come and gone. LSAT scores are out. Congratulations to all who wrote the June exam! For everyone preparing for an upcoming LSAT or interested in the breakdown of the June LSAT's composition, we've analyzed the test in detail and would like to share our insights with you. Today we'll get our recap kicked off with Logical Reasoning. Subscribe to this blog to get notified of our upcoming posts, including complete video explanations of the games and an in-depth recap of Reading Comprehension.

Ready for the "TL;DR" version of the June 2017 LR sections? Here are the highlights:

  • Heavy use of conditional reasoning and formal logical structure on a broad cross-section of questions.
  • Continued importance of causal reasoning, but principally on a restricted set of question tasks.
  • Compared to the December 2016 test and statistical averages, a higher ratio of Weaken questions to Strengthen questions.
  • Use of a couple minor informal fallacies.

Read below for a detailed discussion of the above points and statistics about the questions.

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Topics: LSAT Logical Reasoning, LSAT Prep, LSAT Forum

The June 2017 LSAT Scoring Scale Analyzed

Posted by Jon Denning on

The scores from the June 2017 LSAT have just been released, and the scoring scale is hot off the presses. We'll have some section-specific discussions in the days ahead, but in the meantime I wanted to take a moment to analyze the scoring scale and what it tells us about the logical difficulty of this exam. As my colleague Dave Killoran has written elsewhere, each LSAT scoring scale is adjusted to fit the difficulty of that particular test:

"Although the number of questions per test has remained relatively constant over the years, the logical difficulty of each test has varied. This is not surprising since the test is made by humans, and there is no precise way to completely predetermine logical difficulty. To account for these variances in test "toughness," the test makers adjust the Scoring Conversion Chart for each LSAT in order to make similar LSAT scores from different tests mean the same thing."

So, the looseness or tightness of the scale will reflect the logical difficulty of the exam (loose scale with a harder exam, tight scale with an easier exam), and has a huge impact on final scores. With that in mind, how did this one turn out?

Here it is in full:

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Topics: LSAT Prep

What Does it Mean to "Go Grey" on LSAT Score Release Day?

Posted by Jon Denning on

One of the most common talking points you'll hear leading up to an LSAT score releaseand incessantly on the day scores become availableis the notion of "going grey." In fact a hysterical flurry of "I'M  GREY!!" announcements on twitter and elsewhere is one of the most reliable predictors that scores are imminent.

So what's all this grey business about, and how can you determine your own color status?

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Topics: LSAT Prep