With the LSAT just around the corner, you may be taking a look at how your prep is going and thinking that you are simply not ready for the test. There's no shame in this; in fact, knowing when you are or are not ready for the LSAT shows a great deal of self-awareness and respect for your law school application. 

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Topics: LSAT Prep

With the LSAT fast approaching, I want to briefly step away from talk of test concepts, and remind everyone of one of the most important, and (sadly) most-overlooked, components of test success: a positive mental outlook. That is, at some point in the next 10 days or so you should feel as though your conceptual preparation is complete, and your focus should begin to shift instead towards preparing yourself mentally for an amazing test day experience. Here are a few keys tips that will help get you mentally ready in the days ahead.

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Topics: LSAT Test Mentality, LSAT Prep

Recently, LSAC released a statement indicating that the registration deadline for the February 2017 LSAT would occur before the scores from the December 2016 LSAT were released. This places December test takers in a tough spot if they think they might want to retake the LSAT since they will need to decide on registering prior to knowing how they scored on  the December test. And unfortunately, this isn't the last time this is going to occur. Let's talk about why this is occurring, and what it means for test takers going forward.

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Topics: LSAT Prep

Over on the PowerScore LSAT Discussion Forum, there has been a spate of discussions about how to best review practice LSATs and homework problems. I'm seeing students make a critical error as they study, and so I want to talk about that, and then lay down a framework for optimally reviewing the problems that you complete. This will help you get the most out of the time that you spend studying. Let's start by asking, what is the critical study error that many students are making?

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Topics: LSAT Prep

Although people don't think that Reading Comprehension and Logic Games have much to do with each other, the truth is that they have something very important in common. The most obvious thing that the sections have in common is their structure. Both the sections have four main units. The Game section has four games and the Reading Comprehension section has four passages. And the number of questions associated with each game or passage is similar too. That similar structure creates another similarity - timing.

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Topics: LSAT Reading Comprehension, LSAT Prep

It's fair to say that conditional reasoning is either the bane of your test prep, or a welcome escape from the uncertainty that plagues causal reasoning.  In the first few months of test prep, you will likely see conditional reasoning everywhere: understanding conditional reasoning can easily turn into an obsession, prompting you to diagram whenever you come across any of the indicators of conditionality. The costs of this approach ultimately outweigh the benefits. As you progress through your studies, you will hopefully develop a more careful, judicious approach to diagramming. As we've said in the past, you should diagram only when you think it will help you better understand what the author is saying.

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Topics: LSAT Prep