The Ultimate Test Mentality Resource List

Posted by Dave Killoran on

With the LSAT coming up next week, during this final week you should make sure you are as mentally well-prepared as possible for Saturday. To help you reach a state of pure mental power and balance, I've compiled a list of my favorite LSAT confidence resources. Make sure to set aside some time before the test to think about how you will approach the LSAT when it begins, and especially how you will react if you encounter any difficulties. It's an essential step, and one that can dramatically impact your score. Here's the list:

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Topics: LSAT Test Mentality, LSAT Prep

LSAT Reading Comprehension Note-Taking - Mark Up Your Map

Posted by Adam M. Tyson on


Taking notes on Reading Comp passages can be a challenge for many students, especially because RC on the LSAT is so unlike RC on other standardized tests. Most students either forego note-taking altogether in favor of trying to “just get it,” or else they go crazy underlining everything they think might be important somehow.

Neither of these strategies lends itself to the evidence-based approach you should be taking to answering the questions. Instead, what you need is a roadmap.

 

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Topics: LSAT Test Mentality, LSAT Reading Comprehension, LSAT Prep

PowerScore LSAT Forum Post of the Day: Choosing a Prep Course After Reading the PowerScore Bibles

Posted by PowerScore Test Preparation on

Which prep course should you take after reading the PowerScore LSAT Bibles? This is a fantastic question that we get frequently, and in today's LSAT Forum Post of the Day, LSAT expert Nikki Siclunov offers some tips to a student on how to find the best course fit for you.

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Topics: Law School Admissions, LSAT Prep, LSAT Forum

The December 2016 LSAT Reading Comprehension Section Reviewed

Posted by Adam M. Tyson on

Now that the December 2016 test has been released, we can take a preliminary look at the Reading Comprehension passages and see how they stacked up compared to other tests, and see what new twists (if any) they threw at us this time around.

Immediately after the test, when the twittersphere lit up with all the usual comments and complaints and exclamations about what students around the world encountered, all the talk was about the Logic Games section (“The third game took so long!” “What the heck was with that fourth game, and would someone please kill me now?”) and a few specific Logical Reasoning questions (“Iguanas on a raft?” “What’s up with teenagers and their driving accidents?”).

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Topics: LSAT Reading Comprehension, LSAT Prep

December 2016 LSAT Logical Reasoning Recap

Posted by Jonathan Evans on


 Trends in Logical Reasoning: What's In? What's Out? What's Next? 

The LSAC Winter Collection is out! It's a hot one, and we're not just talking leather and fur.   

It is hard to make Logical Reasoning glamorous, but it's not an overstatement to say if you succeed on LR, you'll likely succeed on the LSAT. If you struggle with LR, you're going to be playing catch-up everywhere else, and not just because LR is half your score. 

Logical Reasoning questions illustrate the principles tested throughout the LSAT, so if you master arguments, you're on your way to succeeding both with games and reading comprehension. Argument sections are not as neat and tidy as logic games sections or reading comp, in which you can categorize everything by game or passage, but LR sections do reveal trends in what the LSAC considers important, so they bear analysis.

So how did the December LR sections stack up?

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Topics: LSAT Logical Reasoning, LSAT Prep, LSAT Forum

The December 2016 LSAT Scoring Scale Analyzed

Posted by Jon Denning on

The scores from the December 2016 LSAT have just been released, and the scoring scale is hot off the presses. We'll have some section-specific discussions in the days ahead, but in the meantime I wanted to take a moment to analyze the scoring scale and what it tells us about the logical difficulty of this exam. As my colleague Dave Killoran has written elsewhere, each LSAT scoring scale is adjusted to fit the difficulty of that particular test:

"Although the number of questions per test has remained relatively constant over the years, the logical difficulty of each test has varied. This is not surprising since the test is made by humans, and there is no precise way to completely predetermine logical difficulty. To account for these variances in test "toughness," the test makers adjust the Scoring Conversion Chart for each LSAT in order to make similar LSAT scores from different tests mean the same thing."

So, the looseness or tightness of the scale will reflect the logical difficulty of the exam (loose scale with a hard exam, tight scale with an easy exam), and has a huge impact on final scores. With that in mind, how did this one turn out? Here it is in full:

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Topics: LSAT Prep

LSAT Conditional Reasoning - The Domino Effect

Posted by Adam M. Tyson on

In my previous blog post I talked about the basics of conditional reasoning on the LSAT, and dealt with fairly simple statements involving a single sufficient condition and a single necessary condition. You’ll find that post here:

http://blog.powerscore.com/lsat/lsat-conditional-reasoning-easy-as-falling-off-a-log

On the LSAT, though, things are not always that simple! Sometimes (often, really) you will encounter conditional chains, where one thing is sufficient for another, which is sufficient for a third, which is sufficient for a fourth. Stringing these conditional claims together in the right order, and then knowing which conditions affect others and in what ways, will be crucial to your success. You will encounter chains in Must Be True questions, Parallel Reasoning, Parallel Flaw, Justify the Conclusion, and others. So, how do you manage to interpret the relationships correctly?

By playing with dominoes!

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Topics: LSAT Logical Reasoning, LSAT Prep, LSAT Conditional Reasoning

Why Does It Take So Long For LSAT Scores To Come Out?

Posted by Dave Killoran on

The December 2016 LSAT was administered about three weeks ago, and the scores from that test aren't slated to be released until another nine days from now. Once the LSAT is over, one of the most common complaints is that scores should come out more quickly. Given that we live in an era where tests are electronically scored and the results are transmitted nearly instantly by email, that sounds like a very reasonable complaint. So, why does it take so long for LSAT scores to appear? And couldn't they get them out a lot earlier?

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Topics: LSAT Prep

LSAT Conditional Reasoning - Easy as Falling Off a Log

Posted by Adam M. Tyson on

Conditional reasoning – argumentation based on “if…then” statements – is a prominent feature of the LSAT. While the numbers vary from test to test and year to year, you can expect something in the neighborhood of 10 questions in the Logical Reasoning sections that involve conditional reasoning, and at least half of the Logic Games will employ it as well. Some games (typically undefined or partially defined grouping games) will be entirely conditional, with every single rule setting up an if…then statement (if R is on the committee, X is also on the committee; if W is not on the committee, S is on the committee; etc.). In short, while conditional reasoning is not the be-all and end-all of the LSAT, it is a subject that should be mastered if you want to do well on the test, and it therefore deserves attention and practice.

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Topics: LSAT Logical Reasoning, LSAT Prep, LSAT Conditional Reasoning