With the LSAT just around the corner, you may be taking a look at how your prep is going and thinking that you are simply not ready for the test. There's no shame in this; in fact, knowing when you are or are not ready for the LSAT shows a great deal of self-awareness and respect for your law school application. 

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Topics: LSAT Prep

A question I often receive is, “Should I do a set of warm up questions the morning of the LSAT to get into the right frame of mind?" The idea is that by doing questions prior to the start of the LSAT you will be ready to hit the ground running once the test begins, and that will produce the best possible score. In theory it sounds like a good idea, but does it really work, and should you try it?

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Topics: LSAT Test Mentality, LSAT Prep

There's less than a week to go before the February 2016 LSAT, and students, I imagine yourself included, are in full-on practice test mode. This is a good thing: you need to get acclimated, and timed practice tests are the way to do it.

With that in mind, many wonder where they can best replicate the test day experience. Let's explore some options.

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Topics: LSAT Prep

Are you stressed out about the LSAT? Do you dread taking practice tests? Or how about scoring a practice test? Don't kid yourself. Everyone suffers from some degree of test anxiety. It's only natural, and having a healthy recognition of the gravity of the test can be a very helpful motivator. But let me talk to you for a moment about an LSAT prep superpower you probably don't even know you have. 

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Topics: LSAT Test Mentality, LSAT Prep

It's application season, and we're getting a lot of questions about choosing target schools, letters of recommendations, optional essays, and more. We figured it was a perfect time to share our very popular law school admissions guide "Creating A Killer Law School Application" with those of you who haven't had a chance to check it out. This guide is a collaborative effort with some of the top law school admissions consultants in the country, including Admissions Dean, Law School Expert, Anna Ivey Consulting, InGenius Prep, Admit Advantage, Prelaw Guru, Accepted.com, Pen and Chisel, and Spivey Consulting Group.

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Topics: Law School Admissions, LSAT Prep

Students freak out about many things when they're applying to law school: The relative "prestige" of their undergraduate institution (and how it will be viewed during the admissions process), their choice of major, their letters of recommendation, the one B they got freshman year, the LSAT score they got when they took the test "cold" (p.s., don't do that!)...the list goes on and on. For most students, the fears are unfounded and simply a by-product of a stressful law school admissions process where you nitpick every possible thing about yourself and your file. However, for some students, there are blemishes in their record that are founded and need to be addressed and explained.

That's where addenda come in. As always, let's start with the basics.

An addendum (plural: addenda) is a document, written by the applicant, explaining a negative in their application. It is usually brief in length (no more than one page long, typically only one to two paragraphs), and is included as an attachment to the application.

Students usually write addenda to explain:

  1. Issues with their LSAT record (i.e., a very low LSAT score, multiple absences or cancellations, or an unusually high jump in LSAT scores from one administration to the next);
  2. Issues with their GPA (i.e., a very low GPA, a semester with sub-par grades in an otherwise great transcript, a rash of failed or withdrawn classes, etc).
  3. Issues with the "character and fitness" section of the application (interruption in a student's academic career; academic disciplinary actions; academic probations; academic expulsions; criminal issues such as felonies, misdemeanors, arrests, or convictions; dishonorable discharges from the armed forces)..
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Topics: Law School Admissions