Which Top 50 Law Schools Accept the June LSAT?

Posted by Dave Killoran on

In the last few years, there has been a seismic shift in application deadline dates, which greatly benefits current applicants. A decade ago, only a few schools accepted the results of the February LSAT for fall admission later that year, and many application deadlines were in January (if not December). Fast forward to today, and the situation is much changed! Almost every school now accepts the results of the February LSAT, and, as the table below shows, a significant number of schools in the Top 50 now accept the results of the June LSAT (and many more outside the Top 50 accept June results). In other words, if you are reading this today and have yet to take the LSAT or apply to law school, you could still apply now to a number of schools and attend this fall. Previously, that was unthinkable.

Read More

Topics: Law School Admissions

Taking the LSAT in Armenia

Posted by PowerScore Test Preparation on

Are you taking the LSAT in Armenia? The LSAT is taken by students planning to attend law schools in the US and Canada.  However, the test is administered across the globe, as the LSAT continues to spread internationally. (Check out this blog post we wrote a few years back about the LSAT abroad.)

In Armenia, the LSAT is offered in only one location: Yerevan, American University of Armenia.

While there is just one location option, the LSAT is offered in Armenia four times per year: in February, June, September/October, and December. A complete list of test dates and deadlines can be found here.

Read More

Topics: LSAT International Locations, LSAT Prep

Are There "Reverse-Splitter Friendly" Law Schools?

Posted by Daniel Plainview on

In December of last year we published a post on the topic of which law schools the numbers dictate are “splitter-friendly,” which seemed to generate a lot of interest. For the uninitiated, a “splitter-friendly” school is one that could be said to take a relatively more forgiving look at an applicant’s grade point average (GPA) as long as that applicant has a high LSAT score. One of the obvious follow-up questions for a post like that is, “Well, what about the reverse situation? Are there schools that are more forgiving of lower LSAT scores for applicants who have stellar GPAs?”

Read More

Topics: Law School Admissions

When Will February 2017 LSAT Scores Be Released? Our Prediction!

Posted by Jon Denning on

February 2017 LSAT takers have one burning question in mind: When exactly will my score be released?

Per LSAC, February 2017 LSAT scores are slated to be released on Thursday, March 2nd, 2017. However, past LSAC score-release trends indicate that scores are almost always released earlier than the official date (except when weather conditions have interfered with the original test dates, as was the case with the February 2013 LSAT). So, even though you still have to wait to get your score, you probably won't have to wait until the score-release date designated by the test makers. 

So when will you have it?

Read More

Topics: LSAT Prep

LSAT cancellations, withdrawals, absences: What's the difference?

Posted by PowerScore Test Preparation on

With the LSAT just around the corner, you may be taking a look at how your prep is going and thinking that you are simply not ready for the test. There's no shame in this; in fact, knowing when you are or are not ready for the LSAT shows a great deal of self-awareness and respect for your law school application. 

Read More

Topics: LSAT Prep

Controlling Test Day Anxiety, NASA Style

Posted by Ron Gore on

I recently listened to the National Public Radio (NPR) podcast Fresh Air. They had a fascinating interview with a Canadian astronaut, Col. Chris Hadfield, who was promoting the release of his new book, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth. Col. Hadfield is an interesting guy. From his Facebook description, he was "the first Canadian to walk in space, and it has recently been announced that he will be the first Canadian to command the international space station."

Read More

Topics: LSAT Test Mentality, LSAT Prep

Advanced LSAT Guessing Strategy: Referring To Prior Answers

Posted by Dave Killoran on

In a perfect world, you'd never have to guess on any question while taking the LSAT. But, there are occasions where time simply runs out, and when that occurs you have to guess (especially because, unlike the SAT, there is no penalty for guessing on the LSAT). I've talked elsewhere about Basic LSAT Guessing Strategy, which is based on answer choice appearance probabilities. As that article discusses, historically some answers are more likely to appear than others, and you can often gain an advantage by knowing those tendencies when the occasion arises. But, are there other guessing strategies you can employ?

Read More

Topics: LSAT Prep