September 2017 LSAT Logical Reasoning Recap

Posted by Jonathan Evans on


TOO ILLICIT TO QUIT

Y'all ready to make some illicit inferences? It's that time again, post-Grey Day; September LSAT scores are out. Congratulations to all who wrote the exam! At PowerScore, we strive to give students the most up-to-the-minute information possible about past and upcoming LSATs, and in keeping with this goal, we are proud to share our recap of the September 2017 Logical Reasoning sections. Recaps of both Logic Games and Reading Comprehension will follow shortly, so please subscribe to the blog to get notified of these and other upcoming posts, including weekly discussions of interest to all preparing for an upcoming LSAT or law school admissions.

Let's get down to business! Here are the highlights from the September 2017 LR sections:

  • A rare circular reasoning fallacy (!) on a flaw question.
  • Continued importance of ability to prephrase accurate, abstract descriptions of scenarios presented in Flaw and Method of Reasoning questions.
  • Fill-in-the-blank question used for a hybrid Main Point/Must Be True task.
  • Slightly above-average number of difficult questions among the first ten.
  • Continued high frequency of questions involving conditional reasoning.

Read below for further discussion and statistics about the questions.

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Topics: LSAT Logical Reasoning, LSAT Prep, LSAT Forum

Tips For LSAT Method of Reasoning - Argument Part Questions

Posted by Eric Ockert on

As the calendar turns from July to August, preparation for the September LSAT starts to heat up. For many of our students, August finds them moving beyond the halfway point in their respective courses and coming down the home stretch. Yet all of a sudden, the dog days of August start to feel more like the Dog Days of Abstraction on the Logical Reasoning section. Method, Flaw, Parallel, Principle...the list of abstract question stems seems neverending. Gone are the days of specificity and precision, only to be replaced by the vague wording and abstraction of these new question types.

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Topics: LSAT Logical Reasoning, LSAT Prep

Understanding LSAT Justify the Conclusion/Sufficient Assumption LR Questions

Posted by Dave Killoran on

One of the common questions that comes up with students studying for the LSAT is how do Justify/Sufficient Assumption questions work, and how do they differ from regular Assumption/Necessary Assumption questions? The mere fact that there are different types of assumption questions is part of the problem, but the unique way that these questions work also causes issues. Let's take a closer look at this question type and try to understand the big picture!

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Topics: LSAT Logical Reasoning, LSAT Prep

My LSAT Regimen, Part 3

Posted by Marvin Dike on

Note: PowerScore student Marvin Dike is blogging about his comprehensive and detailed study methodology so that our readers can learn from his experience. Make sure you read Part 1 and Part 2.

Back again for part 3 of the LSAT regimen. I hope you enjoyed part 2 that broke down the best possible way to master Logic Games. Here we are to talk about the skills that are rewarded in Reading Comprehension and Logical Reasoning.

Reading Comprehension

The skill that the LSAT makers reward you for having..... BEYOND understanding VIEWSTAMP and all the wonderful teaching PowerScore has showed us, what they reward you for having is SHORT TERM MEMORY. Now that may seem obvious. And you may think that this skill cannot be strengthened, but it can.

But before I break that down...

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Topics: LSAT Logical Reasoning, LSAT Reading Comprehension, LSAT Prep

June 2017 LSAT Logical Reasoning Recap

Posted by Jonathan Evans on


DON'T CALL IT A COMEBACK

Grey Day has come and gone. LSAT scores are out. Congratulations to all who wrote the June exam! For everyone preparing for an upcoming LSAT or interested in the breakdown of the June LSAT's composition, we've analyzed the test in detail and would like to share our insights with you. Today we'll get our recap kicked off with Logical Reasoning. Subscribe to this blog to get notified of our upcoming posts, including complete video explanations of the games and an in-depth recap of Reading Comprehension.

Ready for the "TL;DR" version of the June 2017 LR sections? Here are the highlights:

  • Heavy use of conditional reasoning and formal logical structure on a broad cross-section of questions.
  • Continued importance of causal reasoning, but principally on a restricted set of question tasks.
  • Compared to the December 2016 test and statistical averages, a higher ratio of Weaken questions to Strengthen questions.
  • Use of a couple minor informal fallacies.

Read below for a detailed discussion of the above points and statistics about the questions.

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Topics: LSAT Logical Reasoning, LSAT Prep, LSAT Forum

Does the LSAT Test Law?

Posted by Eric Ockert on

According to LSAC, the Logical Reasoning portion of the LSAT is designed to "evaluate the ability to analyze, critically evaluate, and complete arguments as they occur in ordinary language . . . These arguments mirror legal reasoning in the types of arguments presented and in their complexity, though few of the arguments actually have law as a subject matter."

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Topics: LSAT Logical Reasoning, LSAT Prep, LSAT Conditional Reasoning

How To Handle "Even If" In Conditional Reasoning (Even If It Doesn't Matter)

Posted by Eric Ockert on

 

Most students confront conditional reasoning very early on in their LSAT preparation. They spend hours mastering the logic of conditional rules in Logical Reasoning stimuli and answer choices, and in Logic Games as well. To this end, students must memorize a number of common conditional reasoning keywords and phrases that help indicate the presence of this logic. Some of these indicators become incredibly obvious with practice. Many of us can recall a moment when, while working through a previously unseen logical reasoning question, we encounter the all-too-familiar "if....then" construction. With a gleam in our eye and a smile across our face, we confidently say to ourselves, "I've got this," and quickly draw out a perfect diagram of the rule.

But every so often there comes a moment when we see that familiar "if", and, just as our hearts start to warm with recognition, a specter looms on the horizon—standing menacingly in front our old friend "if" . . . the word "even". "Even if". Wait . . . what?

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Topics: LSAT Logical Reasoning, LSAT Conditional Reasoning

Numbers and Percentages in Logical Reasoning Questions – Count On It!

Posted by Adam M. Tyson on

The authors of the LSAT love to play with numbers. This makes sense when you consider that the LSAT is a test of logical reasoning, and math is completely logical. While it’s true that they do sometimes test our understanding of actual numerical concepts, like averages and ratios, most of the questions are not testing your math skills. Don’t worry – there won’t be any questions that rely on your remembering the Pythagorean theorem! Instead, they are about logical relationships that happen to involve numbers and percentages. When you encounter them (and you will – there were at least 5 such questions on each of the June and September 2016 tests, and at least 6 on the December 2016 test) it can sometimes help to supply some numbers of your own to make sense of things.

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Topics: LSAT Logical Reasoning, LSAT Prep

Enroll in a PowerScore Full-Length LSAT Course and get two Advanced Courses for Free!

Posted by PowerScore Test Preparation on

Are you preparing for the June LSAT? If so, we have great news! For a limited time, everyone who enrolls in the PowerScore Full-Length LSAT CourseLive Online LSAT Course, or On Demand LSAT Course will be given access to both of our Advanced LSAT Courses for free!

The Advanced Logic Games Course is taught by Dave Killoran, author of the renowned PowerScore Logic Games Bible, and the Advanced Logical Reasoning Course is taught by Dave Killoran as well as PowerScore Vice President and Senior Course Developer Jon Denning. 

The two Advanced Courses normally sell for $350 each, with each course featuring over twenty hours of online instruction. 

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Topics: LSAT Logic Games, LSAT Logical Reasoning, LSAT Prep