ABA On Track To Drop LSAT Requirement: What Happens Now?

Posted by Dave Killoran on

This article was co-written with Mike Spivey of Spivey Consulting.

What happened?

On Friday, May 11th an ABA council approved a proposal that formally removes the requirement that the LSAT be used for admissions purposes at every ABA-approved law school. In its place is broader language that allows schools to skip using an admissions test entirely if they so choose.

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Topics: LSAT Prep, GRE

Yale Law School To Accept GRE Scores

Posted by Dave Killoran on

A full year after rival Harvard's decision to accept GRE scores in lieu of the LSAT, Yale Law School (https://law.yale.edu/) announced on Friday that it too would begin implementing the use of GRE scores in the law school admission process effective immediately. "Enough is enough. We’ve waited over 12 months for those guys to come to their senses, but it’s obvious that Harvard sees the GRE as its way of finally beating us in the all-important law school rankings," said Yale spokesperson N. Feriority. "We've been #1 so long that it would be a crippling blow to our self-esteem if we somehow dropped behind Harvard or Stanford. So guess what? It’s GRE time for us, too."

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Topics: Law School Admissions, LSAT Prep, GRE

Harvard Law School Will Accept the GRE for Admission Beginning in 2017

Posted by Jon Denning on

Hot on the heels of the newly-released US News annual list of law school rankings, an announcement of even greater impact has just been made: "Starting in the fall of 2017, Harvard Law School will allow applicants to submit either the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) to be considered for admission to its three-year J.D. program."  

This news comes courtesy of Harvard Law Today, and marks the second ABA-accredited law school to begin accepting GRE scores in lieu of the LSAT for regular admission. However, while Harvard isn't the first, it is the industry standard, and indicates what will likely be a tipping point in the admissions process as other schools rush to follow suit.

Let's take a look at what this policy change may mean for the LSAT and law school applications in the years ahead.

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Topics: Law School Admissions, LSAT Prep, GRE

Can you prepare for standardized tests such as the LSAT, SAT, and GRE? Part 2

Posted by Dave Killoran on

In my last post, I talked about the myth that you can't prepare for standardized tests, how that myth was created, and why it has been perpetuated. In this post, we'll look at some explanations for why those beliefs are false. 

Let’s begin by looking at the original broad-based tests that started the whole thing: the Army Alpha tests, which were meant to reveal native ability. For example, they intended to “Supply a mental rating for each soldier” and “Assist in discovering men of superior mental ability,” among other goals, which would then allow the Army to place soldiers into the best possible job for their skills. Did the test do that? In a word, no. Here are three sample questions from those original Army Alpha tests, with answers immediately following: 

Directions:   First unscramble the words to form a sentence, and then indicate if the sentence is true or false.

  1.       happy is man sick always a

 

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Topics: LSAT Prep, GRE

Can you prepare for standardized tests such as the LSAT, SAT, and GRE? Part 1

Posted by Dave Killoran on

I met some new people the other day, and when I explained to them what it was that I did, one of the guys asked me whether you could actually prepare for tests like the LSAT (or GMAT, GRE, SAT, etc). I get that question enough that it doesn't bother me, and in fact, I always find it an interesting conversation (whether they find it an interesting conversation is a different matter though!). While it is near gospel that almost any endeavor that requires skill—such as playing an instrument, pole-vaulting, learning to cook, or even wine tasting—also requires significant preparation or practice time, when it comes to standardized testing the belief is often that you can't prepare, and you really can only rely on your basic abilities to succeed. Why is that belief so prevalent, and why is it incorrect?

The myth that you can't prepare for standardized tests comes from a few sources. The first traces back to the historical origins of the first standardized tests in the US. When the first large-scale tests were implemented—IQ tests given to Army recruits during World War I, later the Army's Alpha tests, and eventually the SAT—the people making and administering the tests believed they were indicative of native ability. As Nicholas Lemann, author of The Big Test, says, the original test creators “clearly believed in the basic theory that intelligence is an innate and sort of biological quality and that it's the most important human quality.” In other words, they thought they were giving tests built to measure you exactly as you were, and which could reveal your inherent capacities. Since the test creators also believed you cannot change your inherent abilities, the message they sent to the world was these tests, by their very nature, disallowed preparation. Consequently, this belief became one of the founding axioms of admissions-related tests. This belief was also completely false, but that wasn't known until well after the myth was entrenched.

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Topics: LSAT Prep, GRE