Nikki Siclunov

Nikki Siclunov has been with PowerScore since 2005, and is one of the company’s head publications developers. As a Senior LSAT Instructor with a 99th percentile score, Nikki has taught thousands of students in New York, Boston, and Philadelphia. Nikki attended Harvard College, graduating magna cum laude with the highest honors in the field of Literature. He also received a M.Phil. in Comparative Literature from Yale University.

Recent Posts

Should you cancel your LSAT score?

Posted by Nikki Siclunov on

With the LSAT done and over with, many test-takers will be asking themselves, "Should I cancel my score?" If you find yourself amidst their numbers, don't worry--you're definitely not alone.

First off, let us start by saying that it is very common for LSAT-takers to second-guess themselves and fret--almost from the moment they exit the testing center--about how they did on the test, what their score might be, which questions they got right and wrong, and if they should cancel their score.

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Topics: LSAT Prep

LSAT Test Takers: Blogs You Should Have Bookmarked

Posted by Nikki Siclunov on

With the LSAT getting closer and closer, everyone and their mother is quick to offer you a last-minute tip. Most everyone (we hope) means well. Sleep more! Study more! Worry less! Eat well! Exercise! etc. While we hope that our Blog is a reasonable voice in this cacophony of wisdom, there is no question that receiving just the right advice, and at the right time, is not always easy. (OK, it's a little easier if you pay for it).

Now more than ever, you want the advice you receive to be on point. To that end, below you will find a list of our most helpful blog posts we've written over the last few years, organized by subject matter and area of concern. This represents the collective wisdom of some of the world's foremost LSAT experts, so handle it with caution: it may cause brilliance!

Just kidding. 

But seriously: these are all Blog articles you should have bookmarked. Now, thanks to me, you don't have to: just bookmark this one instead. Good luck!

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Topics: LSAT Prep

Good News! You Just Bombed Your LSAT Practice Test

Posted by Nikki Siclunov on

The next LSAT is just around the corner, you're regularly taking practice tests in preparation...and you suddenly score 5 points lower than last time. What?? Why?! You are (understandably) freaked out.

You call your best friend, your shrink, your tutor—all the same person if you're lucky— to ask the crucial question: should you postpone your LSAT?

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Topics: LSAT Prep

Why you should take the LSAT in June (and not in September)

Posted by Nikki Siclunov on


It's almost May. By now, you've probably started a test prep course, bought the Bible Trilogy, and/or invested a considerable amount of money purchasing PrepTests. You may have even started working with a tutor. If you are seeing an uptick in your practice test scores, that's awesome. Chances are, however, that you aren't anywhere near where you hope to be in June.

Soon you will start debating whether to put it all off until September (if you haven't already). It's easy to rationalize such a decision: if you're still in school, you can focus on your finals without the added aggravation of yet another test, arguably more important than any of them. Plus, you'll have the whole summer to study, and besides - what else are you going to do on the beach?

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Topics: LSAT Prep

Not a morning person? Start behaving like one if you want to kill it in February

Posted by Nikki Siclunov on


Depending on how close you are to your test center, you may need to wake up at 6 AM to take the February LSAT. Unless you are decidedly a "morning person," this could be a problem. Even if you do manage to fall asleep at a reasonable hour the day before (unlikely, unless you train for it), chronic sleep deprivation can profoundly affect how much you get out of your test prep, and adversely affect your performance on the test.

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Topics: LSAT Prep

This Thanksgiving, Be Grateful for the LSAT

Posted by Nikki Siclunov on

In a piece he published in the NYTimes, Artur Brooks argues that acting grateful can actually make you grateful. We have long been conditioned to believe that gratitude is not real unless it is sincere, but new research shows that emotional authenticity is somewhat overrated. Apparently, a 2014 article in the journal Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience identified a variation in a gene (CD38) associated with gratitude, suggesting that we can actively choose to practice gratitude, and become happier as a result. The power of positive thinking at work, as it were, which is something we've been saying for years.

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Topics: LSAT Prep

Is the LSAT Getting Strange(r)?

Posted by Nikki Siclunov on

Whether the test is getting more and more "unusual" or "weird" is a question we get on a weekly basis. It's an understandable worry: all of your prep work is based on the fundamental assumption that the skills being tested on the LSAT do not vary from one administration to the next. Rest assured that they do not: every LSAT tests your ability to reason with conditional statements, to infer what must be true or false from a given set of rules, to recognize logical equivalency and reason from analogy, to determine the effect of additional statements on the logical validity of a given argument , to identify the conclusions, fallacies, and assumptions of various arguments, etc. That said, it is absolutely true that in recent years, LSAC has made a concerted effort to test these skills in more unusual and less predictable ways.

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Topics: LSAT Prep