Eric Ockert

Eric Ockert has worked in test preparation since 1999. In that time he has taught SAT, ACT, LSAT and GMAT preparation. Since joining PowerScore in 2005, Eric has taught over 100 PowerScore courses around the country, and has helped thousands of students prepare for the LSAT. He currently helps develop much of our online content and is the featured Instructor on the PowerScore LSAT On Demand Course. Eric scored in the 99th percentile on his first officially administered LSAT, GMAT, and even scored a 36 on his first official ACT. He is a graduate of Northwestern University and the University of Iowa College of Law.

Recent Posts

September 2017 LSAT Reading Comprehension Recap

Posted by Eric Ockert on

Last week, the results of the September 2017 LSAT were released. The feedback we have received from students has been quite mixed, with only a few consensus observations so far. We previously broke down the Logical Reasoning section of the test last week and the scoring scale yesterday, and will be addressing the Logic Games section in the next couple of days.

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Topics: LSAT Reading Comprehension, LSAT Prep

LSAT Tactical Advice: Trust The Process

Posted by Eric Ockert on

You often hear about the dichotomy in the law between substantive law and procedural law.  To know the substantive law concerning an issue, one must know what laws and rules govern in certain situations and when to apply those laws. The procedural side of law focuses on the method or process of moving through the judicial system. A good lawyer needs to know both of these aspects of the law well.

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Topics: LSAT Prep

Tips For LSAT Method of Reasoning - Argument Part Questions

Posted by Eric Ockert on

As the calendar turns from July to August, preparation for the September LSAT starts to heat up. For many of our students, August finds them moving beyond the halfway point in their respective courses and coming down the home stretch. Yet all of a sudden, the dog days of August start to feel more like the Dog Days of Abstraction on the Logical Reasoning section. Method, Flaw, Parallel, Principle...the list of abstract question stems seems neverending. Gone are the days of specificity and precision, only to be replaced by the vague wording and abstraction of these new question types.

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Topics: LSAT Logical Reasoning, LSAT Prep

June 2017 Reading Comprehension Recap

Posted by Eric Ockert on



Well, the results are in. Overall, the June 2017 Reading Comprehension section proved to follow the general theme found elsewhere on the June 2017 test: the section was fairly average. While the Psychology passage in Passage 2 was challenging, the remaining three passages were all moderate to easy. There were no big surprises with passage positioning, as the easiest two passages were located in Passage 1 and Passage 3, so most test takers probably found enough time to reach both of them. There were seven questions in each of Passage 1, 2, and 4, while Passage 3 only had 6, for a total of 27 questions. The difficulty and types of questions were also fairly balanced throughout although again, Passage 2 seemed to have a bit more of the difficult questions. One interesting anomaly was that every single passage included a Parallel Reasoning question. That equals the four total Parallel questions found on the two Logical Reasoning sections.
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Topics: LSAT Reading Comprehension, LSAT Prep, LSAT Forum

Does the LSAT Test Law?

Posted by Eric Ockert on

According to LSAC, the Logical Reasoning portion of the LSAT is designed to "evaluate the ability to analyze, critically evaluate, and complete arguments as they occur in ordinary language . . . These arguments mirror legal reasoning in the types of arguments presented and in their complexity, though few of the arguments actually have law as a subject matter."

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Topics: LSAT Logical Reasoning, LSAT Prep, LSAT Conditional Reasoning

How To Handle "Even If" In Conditional Reasoning (Even If It Doesn't Matter)

Posted by Eric Ockert on

 

Most students confront conditional reasoning very early on in their LSAT preparation. They spend hours mastering the logic of conditional rules in Logical Reasoning stimuli and answer choices, and in Logic Games as well. To this end, students must memorize a number of common conditional reasoning keywords and phrases that help indicate the presence of this logic. Some of these indicators become incredibly obvious with practice. Many of us can recall a moment when, while working through a previously unseen logical reasoning question, we encounter the all-too-familiar "if....then" construction. With a gleam in our eye and a smile across our face, we confidently say to ourselves, "I've got this," and quickly draw out a perfect diagram of the rule.

But every so often there comes a moment when we see that familiar "if", and, just as our hearts start to warm with recognition, a specter looms on the horizon—standing menacingly in front our old friend "if" . . . the word "even". "Even if". Wait . . . what?

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Topics: LSAT Logical Reasoning, LSAT Conditional Reasoning