Ron Gore

Ron Gore is a senior LSAT instructor with a 99th percentile score on an officially administered LSAT. After graduating from the University of Virginia, Ron attended the George Mason School of Law, where he served on the Editorial Board of the Law Review. After law school, he served two years as an appellate court law clerk and has been a practicing attorney for several years. Since first joining PowerScore in 2007, Ron has helped thousands of students prepare for the LSAT, and has co-authored several volumes of PowerScore's LSATs Deconstructed series.

Recent Posts

Controlling Test Day Anxiety, NASA Style

Posted by Ron Gore on

I recently listened to the National Public Radio (NPR) podcast Fresh Air. They had a fascinating interview with a Canadian astronaut, Col. Chris Hadfield, who was promoting the release of his new book, An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth. Col. Hadfield is an interesting guy. From his Facebook description, he was "the first Canadian to walk in space, and it has recently been announced that he will be the first Canadian to command the international space station."

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Topics: LSAT Test Mentality, LSAT Prep

LSAT Test Mentality: Upgrade Your Brain

Posted by Ron Gore on

Are you stressed out about the LSAT? Do you dread taking practice tests? Or how about scoring a practice test? Don't kid yourself. Everyone suffers from some degree of test anxiety. It's only natural, and having a healthy recognition of the gravity of the test can be a very helpful motivator. But let me talk to you for a moment about an LSAT prep superpower you probably don't even know you have. 

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Topics: LSAT Test Mentality, LSAT Prep

LSAT Score Plateau? Focus on Process

Posted by Ron Gore on

A few weeks before the LSAT, many people find themselves on a plateau. They just can't seem to improve their scores. People find themselves on plateaus for many different reasons. One of those causes is lack of organization. Over time, when you've done quite a bit of studying for the test, you can start to get lazy with your process. If you're stuck on a plateau, one of the best things you can do is impose organization on your process, which can reduce your time per question and increase your accuracy.

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Topics: LSAT Test Mentality, LSAT Prep

A Timing Strategy for Faster Reading Comprehension Performance

Posted by Ron Gore on

Although people don't think that Reading Comprehension and Logic Games have much to do with each other, the truth is that they have something very important in common. The most obvious thing that the sections have in common is their structure. Both the sections have four main units. The Game section has four games and the Reading Comprehension section has four passages. And the number of questions associated with each game or passage is similar too. That similar structure creates another similarity - timing.

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Topics: LSAT Reading Comprehension, LSAT Prep

Timing Strategy: Quit While the Quitting's Good

Posted by Ron Gore on

On a long drive this week I enjoyed a marathon of Freakonomics Radio, one of the most interesting and informative podcasts around. So I begin this post with a massive hat tip to their 2011 show called The Upside of Quitting. That episode centered on the efficiency gained by knowing when to quit, even if doing so runs counter to a prevailing norm that quitting is somehow nearly always bad.

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Topics: LSAT Prep

Everyday LSAT: O.J. Simpson's Bloody Gloves

Posted by Ron Gore on

The most memorable line from O.J. Simpson’s 1994-95 jury trial, other than the “not guilty” verdicts, was defense attorney Johnnie Cochran’s genius phrase, “If it doesn’t fit, you must acquit.” That clear, simple rule is widely thought to be a key factor in Simpson’s acquittal. In today’s post, we’re going to look at that statement and its circumstances in the context of the LSAT.

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Topics: LSAT Prep

Everyday LSAT: Is Football Really Safer than Riding A Bicycle?

Posted by Ron Gore on

Recently, Chris Borland, a promising linebacker for the San Francisco 49ers just coming out of his rookie season, announced that he was retiring from football. He retired because he was concerned about chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a poorly understood neurodegenerative disease associated with head trauma. Over the last several years, concerns about damage from head trauma related to professional football have gotten increasing news coverage. During an interview concerning Borland's retirement, Dr. Joseph Maroon,  a neurosurgeon and sports medicine expert who is the team neurosurgeon for the Pittsburgh Steelers, said that it is more dangerous for a child to ride a bike than it is for a child to play football. Hmm. Let's take a closer look.

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Topics: LSAT Logical Reasoning, LSAT Prep

LSAT Lessons from Ghost Ranch

Posted by Ron Gore on

Ghost Ranch, just north of Santa Fe, New Mexico, is a sight to behold. When you stand in the midst of its small buildings, you’re surrounded by mountains. Some peaks are 10,000 feet high, covered in snow. Some are between 5,000 and 7,000 feet, rose-red and rocky, reminiscent of the Martian surface. The expansive grandeur of the mountainous vistas combines with the minute details of the arid soil and its unique flora to overwhelm your senses. It’s impossible to take it in all at once. You’ve got to organize the input and marshal your senses to get the most out of the experience.

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Topics: LSAT Test Mentality, LSAT Prep