Daniel Plainview

Daniel Plainview is a pseudonym, but in the near past he was a law school applicant just like you. He scored a 178 on the LSAT and cites the PowerScore LSAT Bibles as his main resource when he was preparing for the test. He previously operated his own website for law school applicants, and he has graciously agreed to write a series of data-focused articles for PowerScore readers.

Recent Posts

Are There "Reverse-Splitter Friendly" Law Schools?

Posted by Daniel Plainview on

In December of last year we published a post on the topic of which law schools the numbers dictate are “splitter-friendly,” which seemed to generate a lot of interest. For the uninitiated, a “splitter-friendly” school is one that could be said to take a relatively more forgiving look at an applicant’s grade point average (GPA) as long as that applicant has a high LSAT score. One of the obvious follow-up questions for a post like that is, “Well, what about the reverse situation? Are there schools that are more forgiving of lower LSAT scores for applicants who have stellar GPAs?”

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Topics: Law School Admissions

Which Law Schools Are Splitter-friendly? And Which Aren't?

Posted by Daniel Plainview on

When you discuss law school applications, the question of which schools are "splitter friendly" comes up pretty often, and it's not really an easy question to answer. Are we looking for schools to which a high percentage of splitters are admitted relative to non-splitter applicants? Schools that seem to value an applicant’s LSAT score much more than his/her GPA? How about schools that are willing to go really low on the GPA scale to nab those high LSAT scores?

There is actually a lot of overlap between those questions, but they're not all the same thing. There is a ton of anecdotal evidence out there, but the point of this blog is to try to get to the bottom of what the numbers themselves can tell us. With the "splitter friendly" question, it's not all that easy.

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Topics: Law School Admissions

Does submitting an early law school application improve your chances?

Posted by Daniel Plainview on

Applying Early

When I was getting ready to apply to law school a few years ago, I remember very clearly checking on the dates that applications opened at each of the schools I was interested in, and anxiously waiting for those dates to arrive.  I figured that if I applied early on in the process, I was giving myself the best possible shot at being accepted.  After all, everywhere I looked on line the message was the same: apply as early as you can, apply today!  Actually, apply yesterday, because if you don’t, then all hope is surely lost.

To be honest, having your applications ready to go on day one is not the worst idea in the world, for reasons wholly unrelated to whether or not it improves your chances of admission.  First, I’m generally just a proponent of getting things done early rather than later, because who knows what might happen a week from now that will prevent you from getting that application finished?  If you have the time now, why not use it?  Second, it’s a great way to spend that anxiety-ridden period between taking the LSAT and getting the results.  I know for me, it helped keep my mind occupied on something other than a score I no longer had any control over.  But, does applying early actually have any effect on whether or not you’re admitted to a given law school? 

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Topics: Law School Admissions

Applying to Law School: To Early Decision or Not to Early Decision

Posted by Daniel Plainview on

Being a law school applicant is a tougher job than most people probably think.  The first and most obvious obstacle to overcome is the LSAT, which is a real (though very slayable) beast.  Once armed with an LSAT score, however, a whole new set of stressors emerge, as a future law student starts the law school application process.  Part of this process necessarily involves winnowing down the 200+ schools into a realistic and manageable list of those that she would like to attend and to which she has a reasonable shot at admission.  Often, part of an applicant’s calculation is whether to apply through a school’s early binding decision (ED) process. But, are some schools more ED friendly than others? It appears so.

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Topics: Law School Admissions