Posted by on 6/10/2015


Applying to grad school can sometimes feel like a maze where documents are requested, fees are paid, tests are taken, and essays are written, all without any seeming rhyme or reason. How can you make sense of it all, and be successful in your quest for admission to a graduate program?

We've been breaking down the process, step by step, for the past 2 months. In this final post, we'll talk about your transcripts.

Today's post is pretty straightforward--there's very little you can do about your transcripts other than request them, submit them, and explain any negatives in them. We'll cover each of these in turn.

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Topics: Grad School Admissions

Posted by on 6/3/2015


We're on week 7 of our "Gearing up for Grad School" series, and this week, we'll talk about your CV. Although not all grad schools will request that you submit a résumé or curriculum vitae (CV) with your application, many will. It is important to know what to include, what not to include, and how long the document should be.

A standard job-seeking résume will not work for a grad school application, nor will a standard one-page academic résumé. Given the focus of graduate school on academic work, it is recommended that you create a multi-page CV with a strong focus on your academic background, achievements, and strengths. You will also include information on your most recent employment history, your activities, and your personal interests, but the focus of the CV should be academic information relevant to the program to which you are applying. 

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Topics: Grad School Admissions

Posted by on 5/26/2015


We're up to our 6th article in our "Gearing up for Grad School" series. This week, we'll talk about your statement of purpose: What it is and how you should write it.

The statement of purpose is one of the primary elements of your grad school application. In it, you directly address why you want to go to grad school, why you're interested in your particular academic field, why you're qualified for graduate study, and what you career plan is. This is why it's called the statement of purpose--you're distilling your purpose in pursuing a graduate education, detailing your plans for this particular academic path.

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Topics: Grad School Admissions

Posted by on 5/20/2015


We've been breaking down the grad school application process, step by step, for the past few weeks. This week, we'll talk about letters of recommendation: What they are, who should write them, and what they should talk about.

Letters of recommendation deserve just as much attention as any other part of your application, for two very important reasons: They come from an outside perspective and speak about you in the third person. This gives them more weight. Letters of recommendation allow admissions officers to corroborate your academic story, be appraised of any personality traits you may not have mentioned throughout the rest of your application, and learn of any other qualifications (positive or negative) that you may bring to the table.

However, because recommendation letters (and recommenders) are also almost completely out of your control, you need to be aware of exactly what you can control, and how you can control it best.

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Topics: Grad School Admissions

Posted by on 5/12/2015

Applying to grad school can sometimes feel like a maze where documents are requested, fees are paid, tests are taken, and essays are written, all without any seeming rhyme or reason. How can you make sense of it all, and be successful in your quest for admission to a graduate program? We're breaking it down, step by step, and this week, we'll talk about the GRE: what it is, when to take it, and how to study for it.

The one thing everyone knows about applying to grad school is that you have to take the GRE. But what is the GRE? What does it test, when do you take it, what should your score be, and can you study for it?

Start by taking a look at our "About The GRE" general overview. Then, read on to find answers to some of the most pressing questions students have about this all-important component of their grad school application.

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Topics: Grad School Admissions, GRE prep

Posted by on 5/7/2015


Applying to grad school can sometimes feel like a maze where documents are requested, fees are paid, tests are taken, and essays are written, all without any seeming rhyme or reason. How can you make sense of it all, and be successful in your quest for admission to a graduate program?

We're breaking down this process into manageable chunks. This week, we'll talk about what to consider when you're choosing the schools to which you will apply.

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Topics: Grad School Admissions

Posted by on 4/29/2015

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As we saw last week, there are many moving parts to keep track of when you're applying to grad school, including... 

  • The application form
  • Statement of purpose
  • Letters of recommendation
  • Résumé
  • Transcripts
  • Standardized test scores
  • Additional essays and documentation

When this many balls are up in the air, it becomes very easy to drop some of them (and sometimes, once they fall you forget to pick them back up!). To make sure that don't miss a beat and keep on top of your apps--and, most importantly, submit them on time and well done--you need to get organized. And you need to do it before you even fill out your first application form. 

Our advice? Follow these steps to get organized: 

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Topics: Grad School Admissions

Posted by on 4/22/2015

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Applying to grad school can sometimes feel like a maze where documents are requested, fees are paid, 

tests are taken, and essays are written, all without any seeming rhyme or reason. How can you make sense of it all, and be successful in your quest for admission to a graduate program?

We'll break it down, step by step, in weekly installments. This week, we'll talk about timing, and the importance of starting the application process early. 

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Topics: Grad School Admissions

Posted by on 4/17/2015


In addition to the GRE General Test (which is the test that comes to mind when most people think of the GRE), the Educational Testing Service offers eight GRE Subject Tests in the following disciplines (click on the links to be taken directly to the ETS page on each specific subject test):


Let's learn a little more about what subject tests are, and what their purpose is.

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Topics: GRE prep

Posted by on 4/6/2015

Students who have taken the GRE have the option of including in their admissions folders the ETS Personal Potential Index, or PPI—an online system of evaluation designed to present a more complete picture of graduate school applicants than is represented by grades and traditional scores. The system gives evaluators the opportunity to rate applicants on six attributes considered vital to successful performance in graduate study:Knowledge and Creativity; Communication Skills; Teamwork; Resilience; Planning and Organization; and Ethics and Integrity.

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Topics: Grad School Admissions